Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us

October 17, 2011 - by: Dan Oswald 1 COMMENTS

What really motivates people at work? Is it money? Is it recognition? Not according to Daniel Pink.

Pink, in his book Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us, maintains there are three things that truly motivate us:

  1. Autonomy – the freedom to choose task, time, technique, and team
  2. Mastery – the desire to get better and better at something that matters
  3. Purpose – the desire to pursue a cause larger than ourselves

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More on “As We Speak: How to Make Your Point and Have It Stick”

September 28, 2011 - by: Mike Maslanka 0 COMMENTS

Employment law attorney Mike Maslanka of Dallas takes a look at the chapter on having difficult conversations with employees from  As We Speak: How to Make Your Point and Have It Stick by Peter Meyers and Shann Nix.

Previously, I wrote about As We Speak: How to Make Your Point and Have It Stick by Peter Meyers and Shann Nix, but it’s so good, I thought it deserved revisiting. There is a great chapter on conducting conversations with employees, and I wanted to tell you about it. They call it “Bridges to Dialogue.” It’s essentially a step-by-step process on dealing with employee issues. First, the authors advise you to define your outcome. They write that you should tell yourself that by the end of a conversation with an employee, the employee will do “X” or you will be on the road to “X.”

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Blind Spots: Why We Fail to Do What’s Right and What to Do about It

June 29, 2011 - by: Mike Maslanka 0 COMMENTS

Employment law attorney Micheal Maslanka reviews Blind Spots: Why We Fail to Do What’s Right and What to Do about It, finding it provides real insight into the ethics of judging employees on their outcomes and not their methods.

In Blind Spots: Why We Fail to Do What’s Right and What to Do about It, authors Max H. Bazerman and Ann E. Tenbrunsel recount an experiment they conducted. Group A read that a researcher submitted a drug application and included data points that were earlier tossed out on a technicality. The drug was approved, but the patients who took it died. In Group B, the researcher faked the data points, the drug was approved, and it was a success. After the study participants read one or the other’s story, they were asked how unethical they believed the researcher to be. Those who read Story A were much more critical of the researcher than those who read Story B and felt that he should be punished more harshly.

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Profit at the Bottom of the Ladder

June 01, 2011 - by: admin 0 COMMENTS

In her book Profit at the Bottom of the Ladder: Creating Value by Investing in Your Workforce, Canadian researcher Jody Heymann analyzes hundreds of interviews with front line employees to C-suite executives and concludes that your company can profit more from improving worker conditions than cutting wages, benefits, and other workforce expenses.

As an example of that theory Heymann gives the example of a small manufacturing company in Europe that used flexible policies and a team approach in production. The team approach rewarded the team for performance and gave everyone an incentive not to take time off if they didn’t need to, while flexible policies made it possible to take time off if needed. After three years with the two factors in place, absenteeism dropped by 28 percent in the summer and 39 percent in the winter, Heymann reported.

Fire Somebody Today: And Other Surprising Tactics for Making Your Business a Success

April 06, 2011 - by: Mike Maslanka 1 COMMENTS


Employment law attorney Mike Maslanka reviews Bob Pritchett’s Fire Somebody Today: And Other Surprising Tactics for Making Your Business a Success.

In his book Fire Someone Today: And Other Surprising Tactics for Making Your Business a Success Bob Pritchett nails why managers are always afraid to fire someone: They fear admitting they made a mistake in the hiring process.

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Shine: Using Brain Science to Get the Best from Your People

March 23, 2011 - by: Mike Maslanka 0 COMMENTS


Employment law attorney Michael Maslanka reviews Shine: Using Brain Science to Get the Best from Your People by Edward M. Hallowell and finds it offers good advice on finding a dream that matches your talents.

In Shine: Using Brain Science to Get the Best from Your People, Edward M. Hallowell offers some counterintuitive advice: “Taken by itself, ‘follow your dream’ could be the most dangerous advice ever given.” Why? Because Hallowell argues that we often get no mentorship on which dreams to pick, just “sentimental advice to pursue a dream and the Calvinist command to work hard.” The result is predictable: bitter and unhappy workers because of a mismatch between talent and job.

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Categories: Managing Talent / Review