Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us

October 17, 2011 - by: Dan Oswald 1 COMMENTS

What really motivates people at work? Is it money? Is it recognition? Not according to Daniel Pink.

Pink, in his book Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us, maintains there are three things that truly motivate us:

  1. Autonomy – the freedom to choose task, time, technique, and team
  2. Mastery – the desire to get better and better at something that matters
  3. Purpose – the desire to pursue a cause larger than ourselves

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More on “As We Speak: How to Make Your Point and Have It Stick”

September 28, 2011 - by: Mike Maslanka 0 COMMENTS

Employment law attorney Mike Maslanka of Dallas takes a look at the chapter on having difficult conversations with employees from  As We Speak: How to Make Your Point and Have It Stick by Peter Meyers and Shann Nix.

Previously, I wrote about As We Speak: How to Make Your Point and Have It Stick by Peter Meyers and Shann Nix, but it’s so good, I thought it deserved revisiting. There is a great chapter on conducting conversations with employees, and I wanted to tell you about it. They call it “Bridges to Dialogue.” It’s essentially a step-by-step process on dealing with employee issues. First, the authors advise you to define your outcome. They write that you should tell yourself that by the end of a conversation with an employee, the employee will do “X” or you will be on the road to “X.”

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Blind Spots: Why We Fail to Do What’s Right and What to Do about It

June 29, 2011 - by: Mike Maslanka 0 COMMENTS

Employment law attorney Micheal Maslanka reviews Blind Spots: Why We Fail to Do What’s Right and What to Do about It, finding it provides real insight into the ethics of judging employees on their outcomes and not their methods.

In Blind Spots: Why We Fail to Do What’s Right and What to Do about It, authors Max H. Bazerman and Ann E. Tenbrunsel recount an experiment they conducted. Group A read that a researcher submitted a drug application and included data points that were earlier tossed out on a technicality. The drug was approved, but the patients who took it died. In Group B, the researcher faked the data points, the drug was approved, and it was a success. After the study participants read one or the other’s story, they were asked how unethical they believed the researcher to be. Those who read Story A were much more critical of the researcher than those who read Story B and felt that he should be punished more harshly.

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Awake at Work: 35 Practical Buddhist Principles for Discovering Clarity and Balance in the Midst of Work’s Chaos

June 22, 2011 - by: Mike Maslanka 0 COMMENTS

Employment law attorney Micheal Maslanka reviews Michael Carroll’s book Awake at Work: 35 Practical Buddhist Principles for Discovering Clarity and Balance in the Midst of Work’s Chaos. Maslanka offers a solution from a Harvard Business Review blog post for the problem of idiot compassion that Carroll identifies in the book.

In  Awake at Work: 35 Practical Buddhist Principles for Discovering Clarity and Balance in the Midst of Work’s Chaos, author Michael Carroll observes that helping your coworkers isn’t simple or easy. Often, well-intentioned individuals aren’t equipped to give effective help. When they try, it’s like the road to hell ― paved with good intentions. A greater mess is created by well-intentioned but uninformed people than by those who simply leave matters alone.

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Tribal Leadership: Leveraging Natural Groups to Build a Thriving Organization

November 03, 2010 - by: Sarah Hulsey 2 COMMENTS

Sarah Hulsey, PHR, reviews Tribal Leadership: Leveraging Natural Groups to Build a Thriving Organization by David Logan, John King, and Halee Fischer-Wright, finding it insightful and a must-read for HR and management at all levels.

It isn’t often that I read a business management book that I can’t stop talking about, but I absolutely loved Tribal Leadership: Leveraging Natural Groups to Build a Thriving Organization by David Logan, John King, and Halee Fischer-Wright.  Over a 10-year period, the trio studied 24,000 individuals in 24 organizations, researching employee behavior in terms of the groups they form (tribes) and those who assume leadership roles (tribal leaders).  In particular, the authors wanted to find some link between the tribes and their leaders that explains how great leaders emerge, develop new skills, and leave a standing legacy where they work.

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Delivering Happiness: A Path to Profits, Passion, and Purpose

October 06, 2010 - by: Sarah Hulsey 0 COMMENTS

Sarah Hulsey, PHR, reviews Zappos.com CEO Tony Hsieh’s book Delivering Happiness and finds it uplifting and motivating but not necessarily belonging in the business section of the bookstore.

You’d have to be living in a cave to not have heard about Zappos and the work CEO Tony Hsieh is doing to improve customer and employee satisfaction. Regardless of whether you drink the Zappos Kool-Aid, his first book, Delivering Happiness: A Path to Profits, Passion, and Purpose is a worthy weekend read, but perhaps not for the reasons you’d think.

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Work Relationships That Change the World: What’s Love-Love Got to Do with It?

September 29, 2010 - by: Tony Kessler 0 COMMENTS

Group Publisher of Employment Law at M. Lee Smith Tony Kessler reviews Tommy Spaulding’s book It’s Not Just Who You Know, finding the author offers an insightful look into the five different levels of relationships.

Thanks to Facebook, Twitter, Linked-In, blogs, and Skype, most of us have cyber-lists filled to the brim with friends these days. If we’re lucky, more than just a few of them fall into the category of “deep, lasting, ‘call me at 3:00 a.m. no matter what the reason’ relationships,” as author Tommy Spaulding, former CEO of Up With People, describes them in his new (first) book, It’s Not Just Who You Know: Transform Your Life (and Your Organization) by Turning Colleagues and Contacts into Lasting, Genuine Relationships.

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It’s Not a Glass Ceiling, It’s a Sticky Floor

April 07, 2010 - by: admin 1 COMMENTS

Cheryl Stone, SPHR, reviews It’s Not a Glass Ceiling, It’s a Sticky Floor: Free Yourself From the Hidden Behaviors Sabotaging Your Career Success by Rebecca Shambaugh.

In It’s Not a Glass Ceiling, It’s a Sticky Floor: Free Yourself From the Hidden Behaviors Sabotaging Your Career Success, author Rebecca Shambaugh reminds us that even after years of awareness-raising statistics and studies, women remain grossly underrepresented in the top executive earners.  In her book, she attributes this not to the time-honored standards of the old-boy network or the invisible glass ceiling.  Rather, she blames what she calls “self-imposed career blocks” that prevent women from moving up.  She labels these collectively as a “sticky floor” and challenges women to empower themselves by overcoming these seven career-limiting obstacles.
It's Not a Glass Ceiling It's a Sticky Floor

Her concept places more control in the hands of women to get ahead.  By becoming more self-aware, developing a plan, and executing that plan, Shambaugh asserts women can shake themselves loose from the sticky floor and rise to the level of executive management.  Shambaugh leads the reader through an assessment of values and creation of a vision.  She emphasizes the importance of seeking leadership positions that are in alignment with those values and vision to achieve the greatest satisfaction.

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Switch: How to Change Things When Change Is Hard

March 24, 2010 - by: Mike Maslanka 1 COMMENTS

Employment law attorney Michael Maslanka reviews Chip Heath and Dan Heath’s book Switch: How to Change Things When Change Is Hard, finding it both interesting and useful. Maslanka particularly focuses on the authors’ idea of fighting “the negative” by focusing on “bright spots.”

In the book Switch: How to Change Things When Change Is Hard, authors Chip and Dan Heath use a great acronym: “TBU” — true, but useless. They astutely note that people find it easy to list their organization’s problems and why the problems can’t be solved, then basically say, “I’m helpless, you’re helpless. We’re all helpless.” It’s the way we’re wired.

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How the Mighty Fall: And Why Some Companies Never Give In

December 02, 2009 - by: Carol Hacker 0 COMMENTS

Corporate culture and leadership expert Gayle Watson reviews How The Mighty Fall: And Why Some Companies Never Give In, the newest book by Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap… and Others Don’t and Built to Last: Successful Habits of Visionary Companies author Jim Collins.

I just finished reading Jim Collins’ new book, How the Mighty Fall: And Why Some Companies Never Give In. Collins writes that he hopes the book will equip leaders with knowledge about the stages of decline so that they may reduce their chances of falling all the way to the bottom. I particularly liked it because his research provides more evidence that values-based leadership is a differentiating factor between successful companies and those that fail.
How the Mighty Fall by Jim Collins

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