Upgrading your occupational health and safety management systems

May 07, 2017 0 COMMENTS

by Cathy Chandler

Two workers die each day in Canada from a work-related accident or disease. Hundreds more experience a work-related injury, according to the Association of Workers Compensation Boards of Canada 2015 Statistical Report. The statistics are not improving significantly despite an increased focus from regulators, unions, and industry associations on improving occupational health and safety systems. Is the implementation of a more effective occupational health and safety management system (OHSMS) the key to accident prevention?

An OHSMS provides a systematic way to identify hazards and control risks while maintaining assurance that these risk controls are effective. If implemented effectively, an OHSMS will reduce workplace accidents. It will also help organizations avoid costly prosecutions, reduce workers compensation insurance costs, and create a positive safety culture in the organization.

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Employers need to understand injury reporting obligations

June 15, 2014 0 COMMENTS

By Rosalind H. Cooper

In most provinces across Canada, occupational health and safety legislation requires that employers and other workplace parties report injuries and incidents to the appropriate government ministry.

While most reporting requirements relate to workplace injuries, there are also requirements to report certain types of incidents regardless of whether there is an associated injury. Most of these legislative provisions require strict compliance with tight reporting timelines. read more…

Indefinite protection for federal employee disabled by work-related injury

November 11, 2012 0 COMMENTS

by Nicola Sutton

When the employment relationship becomes impossible to perform because of a factor outside the control of a Canadian employer or employee, the employee’s employment can be terminated by virtue of frustration of contract. When an employee won’t be able to return to work because of injury or illness, the same applies. But not so for federally regulated employers such as banks, airlines, inter-provincial trucking companies, etc.

According to the recent decision of Kingsway Transport v. Teamsters, Local Union 91, the frustration argument is no longer available for those employers when the employee’s inability to return to work is because of a work-related injury or illness. read more…