Quebec employers can’t waive notice period provided by resigning employee without providing notice

October 19, 2014 - by: Mohamed Badreddine 0 COMMENTS

by Mohamed Badreddine

Most employers in Quebec know that under Quebec’s Act Respecting Labour Standards (ALS) and the Civil Code of Québec (CCQ), an employer who wishes to terminate an indefinite contract of employment without serious reason must provide notice or pay in lieu of notice. Employees who wish to resign must also give their employer notice of resignation.

In Commission des normes du travail v. Asphalte Desjardins inc., the Supreme Court of Canada held that when an employee gives notice of resignation, the employer cannot waive the notice period and terminate the contract of employment without providing notice or pay in lieu of notice. read more…

Union ordered to pay punitive damages, employer legal costs following illegal strike

October 12, 2014 - by: Lorene Novakowski 0 COMMENTS

By Lorene Novakowski

Following a Canada Industrial Relations Board (CIRB) ruling that an illegal strike had occurred against Canada Post on two dates in November 2010, the corporation sought damages from the union. The issue went before an arbitrator. read more…

It’s not a settlement when the parties can’t agree on what they agreed to

October 05, 2014 - by: Christina Hall 0 COMMENTS

By Christina Hall

It is usually good news for employers and employees if they are able to resolve an employment dispute and reach a settlement before engaging in protracted litigation. However, finalizing the details of a settlement can be a tedious process. When the parties rush through the process or fail to properly consider the terms of the settlement, the situation can rapidly unravel. read more…

Adverse-effect discrimination and probationary employees

September 28, 2014 - by: Kyla Stott-Jess 0 COMMENTS

by Kyla Stott-Jess

In Canada, it is well-established that employers cannot simply terminate employees whose work performance is negatively impacted by disability. Rather, an employer must attempt to accommodate the employee to the point of undue hardship. But what happens when the employee fails to notify the employer of his disability? Further, what accommodation does an employer need to provide to an employee who is still within a three-month probation period? read more…

Transitioning to the new temporary foreign worker rules

September 21, 2014 - by: Gilda Villaran 0 COMMENTS

by Gilda Villaran

There have been many changes to Canada’s immigration program in the past two years. The result? Hiring temporary foreign workers in Canada is more complex than ever before. read more…

British Columbia court offers more lessons about employment contracts

September 14, 2014 - by: Monique Orieux 0 COMMENTS

by Monique Orieux

Last year in Northern Exposure we shared five key lessons about Canadian employment contracts arising from the trial court’s decision in Miller v. Convergys CMG Canada Limited Partnership. The British Columbia Court of Appeal recently issued its decision in the case: Miller v. Convergys CMG Canada Limited Partnership, 2014 BCCA 311. Its decision reinforces those lessons. It also serves as a reminder that employment agreements should be tailored to the individual circumstances of each employee. read more…

Employer obtains injunction to prevent misuse of its confidential information

September 07, 2014 - by: David McDonald 0 COMMENTS

by David McDonald

When an employee announces that he or she is resigning in order to go work for a competitor, it is only natural for an employer to become anxious—particularly when the departing employee has access to the business’s confidential information. Complicating matters further is the technological ease with which an employee can wrongfully divert an employer’s confidential information if he or she wishes to do so. read more…

Disloyal conduct may justify termination

August 31, 2014 - by: Mohamed Badreddine 0 COMMENTS

by Mohamed Badreddine

There is little dispute that senior employees owe a duty of good faith and loyalty to their employers. But what about junior employees—do they owe their employers the same duty? And if so, can they be fired if they violate that duty? Depending on the situation, the answer may be yes—at least in Quebec. read more…

Employers must have a reasonable basis for engaging in employee surveillance

August 17, 2014 - by: Clayton Jones 0 COMMENTS

By Clayton Jones

When confronted with information that an employee may be abusing paid sick leave, it is only natural for an employer to want to investigate further. One way in which employers may do this is through the surreptitious surveillance of the employee. However, such surveillance is of limited value unless the employer will be able to rely on the surveillance in a subsequent legal proceeding. read more…

May the enforceability of your release be with you

August 10, 2014 - by: Hannah Roskey 0 COMMENTS

by Hannah Roskey

We have all been faced with employees’ buyer’s remorse. They accept a severance package, sign a release, cash the severance check, and then claim that the release is unenforceable. Recently the Alberta Human Rights Commission considered this very issue in Marquardt v. Strathcona County. read more…

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