New OSHA reporting requirement takes effect January 1

December 15, 2014 0 COMMENTS

by Judith E. Kramer

A new rule from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requiring employers to notify the agency when an employee is killed on the job or suffers a work-related hospitalization, amputation, or loss of an eye goes into effect on January 1 for workplaces under OSHA’s jurisdiction. The rule also updates the list of employers that are partially exempt from OSHA’s record-keeping requirements.

The previous regulation required employers to report work-related fatalities and in-patient hospitalizations of three or more employees within eight hours of the event. Reporting single hospitalizations, amputations, or loss of an eye wasn’t required under the previous rule.

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OSHA seeks more comments on injury and illness tracking

September 22, 2014 0 COMMENTS

by Judith E. Kramer

The federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has extended the comment period for the proposed rule to improve tracking of workplace injuries and illnesses. Comments will be accepted through October 14.

The proposal, published on November 8, 2013, would amend the agency’s record-keeping regulation to add requirements for the electronic submission of injury and illness information that employers are already required to keep.

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OSHA injury, illness summary to be posted by February 1

January 30, 2013 2 COMMENTS

February 1 marks the deadline for covered employers to post a new summary of work-related injuries and illnesses.

The summary—the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s (OSHA) Form 300A—is required to be posted in the workplace every year from February 1 to April 30. The summary form must be completed and posted even if no work-related injuries or illnesses occurred during the year.

Employers with 10 or more employees whose workplaces aren’t classified as a partially exempt industry must record work-related injuries and illnesses using OSHA Forms 300, 300A, and 301. (Partially exempt industries include those in specific low-hazard retail, service, finance, insurance, or real estate industries.) Information on which employers are required to keep them and links to the forms are available on OSHA’s website.

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What Redskins’ play calls after RG3’s injury teach us about workplace ethics

January 08, 2013 10 COMMENTS

by Mike Maslanka

Anyone watch the Washington Redskins playoff game against the Seattle Seahawks? I am a Redskins fan, so I was naturally concerned about the health of Robert Griffin III, the phenom rookie quarterback, former Baylor standout, winner of the Heisman trophy, and all-around nice guy. Four weeks earlier, he had injured his knee in a game against the Ravens. (He also injured the same knee while playing college ball in 2009.)

Coming into the game, RG3 (as he is known) was wearing a brace. News reports from USA Today quoted the team physician as saying he was a “nervous wreck” letting RG3 play that Sunday night. And then came a sad episode that could end a young man’s career and is made all the sadder because it was avoidable if the boss had made a decision motivated by ethical conduct, not an ostrich-like attitude of self-delusion; a decision that could be made only by a boss, not an employee like RG3, no matter how well-paid; a decision that looked out for the needs of a human being as well as the organization.

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