New immigration bill called radical and not proemployment

August 04, 2017 0 COMMENTS

Immigration snipThe new immigration bill President Donald Trump touts as a way to “restore our competitive edge in the 21st century” calls for cutting immigration levels in half over a decade and creating a points-based system that favors highly educated and skilled immigrants with English ability over those with family in the United States. The bill may never become law or undergo significant changes, but its current form is drawing criticism from some in the employer community.

Although the bill, dubbed the Reforming American Immigration for Strong Employment (RAISE) Act, seeks to reward immigrants who have in-demand job skills, it’s “not a pro-employment bill,” according to an attorney who works with employers in need of foreign workers.

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New rule extends employment term for international STEM students

May 09, 2016 0 COMMENTS

by Elaine Young

The rules affecting how long international students in certain fields can work in the United States without changing their visa status will change on May 10.

Currently, when international students in F-1 visa status graduate with a bachelor’s, master’s, or doctorate from a U.S. school, they can work for one year, in a period called Optional Practical Training (OPT), in a job related to their major field of study. That training period is being extended for international students with science, technology, engineering, or math (STEM) degrees from U.S. schools.

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Spouses of certain H-1B visa workers now eligible for employment authorization

February 25, 2015 0 COMMENTS

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has published final regulations that will extend employment authorization eligibility to spouses of certain nonimmigrant workers who are in the United States on H-1B visas.

The H-1B, or highly-skilled worker, visa is the most commonly discussed and highly sought employment-based nonimmigrant visa. The number of visas available each year is closely capped—20,000 for applicants holding master’s degrees and 65,000 for those holding bachelor’s degrees—so selection is often made using a random lottery. For the 2015 fiscal year, 172,500 applications for H-1B visas were submitted to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services.

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