Notice for Colorado’s new pregnancy accommodation law available

August 15, 2016 0 COMMENTS

by Besse H. McDonald

The Colorado Civil Rights Division has released a suggested notice for employers to post related to the state’s new pregnancy accommodation law. Under the law, Colorado employers must post a notice of employee rights as well as provide written notice to new hires at the start of employment and existing employees no later than December 8, 2016.

The new law, which went into effect on August 10, requires employers to provide reasonable accommodations to applicants and employees for health conditions related to pregnancy or physical recovery from childbirth unless doing so would impose an undue hardship on the employer. The new law’s requirements also include an obligation to engage in the interactive process to identify reasonable accommodations.

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Colorado’s pregnancy accommodation law takes effect August 10

August 02, 2016 0 COMMENTS

by Micah Dawson

Colorado’s new law requiring employers to engage in an interactive process to assess potential reasonable accommodations for applicants and employees with conditions related to pregnancy and childbirth will go into effect on August 10.

The new law, House Bill 16-1438, stipulates that employers must engage in the interactive process, provide reasonable accommodations for eligible individuals, prohibit retaliation against employees and applicants who request or use a pregnancy-related accommodation, and provide notice of employees’ rights under the law.

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New final rule updates sex discrimination guidelines for federal contractors

June 14, 2016 0 COMMENTS

Federal contractors are getting a look at a new regulation aimed at preventing sex discrimination in employment, and while many contractors already are in line with its provisions, the new rule may create tension in some areas.

The U.S. Department of Labor’s (DOL) Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP) released a final rule on June 14 replacing sex discrimination guidelines from 1970 with new regulations that align with current law.

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Supreme Court clarifies employer obligations related to pregnant workers

March 25, 2015 2 COMMENTS

The U.S. Supreme Court ruling in Young v. United Parcel Service means employers need to think twice before treating pregnant employees under job restrictions differently than they treat nonpregnant employees who are similarly unable to perform their jobs temporarily.

In a 6-3 ruling handed down March 25, the Court reached for middle ground between interpretations of the Pregnancy Discrimination Act (PDA) offered by both parties as well as the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC). By sending the case back to the lower court, the justices revived the employee’s claim that her treatment violated the PDA.

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Flexible work, job protection, paid leave at heart of White House summit

June 23, 2014 0 COMMENTS

by Tammy Binford

President Barack Obama is launching a new effort aimed at increasing protections, opportunities, and wages for workers to create what the White House envisions as a 21st century workplace.

The president, First Lady Michelle Obama, Vice President Joe Biden, and Dr. Jill Biden are hosting the White House Summit on Working Families on June 23. The agenda calls for sessions focusing on hourly workers, compensation, the structure of the workplace, STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) careers, and nontraditional jobs, among other topics.

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New West Virginia law requires accommodations for pregnant employees

May 23, 2014 0 COMMENTS

by John R. Merinar, Jr., and Carolyn A. Wade

A new West Virginia law taking effect June 4 means employers in the Mountain State must make reasonable accommodations to a job applicant’s or employee’s known limitations involving pregnancy, childbirth, or related medical conditions.

The Pregnant Workers’ Fairness Act amends the West Virginia Human Rights Act. Under the law, the applicant or employee must provide written documentation from a healthcare provider that specifies her limitations and suggests accommodations to address them. The employer must provide the accommodations unless they would result in an undue hardship on the operation of the business.

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Minnesota Women’s Economic Security Act begins to take effect

May 19, 2014 0 COMMENTS

The new Minnesota Women’s Economic Security Act (WESA)—an amalgamation of changes designed to “close the gender gap” by breaking down barriers to economic progress for women—has begun to take effect. Governor Mark Dayton signed WESA into law on Mother’s Day earlier this month. Some of the changes were “effective upon enactment,” which means they went into effect on May 11, 2014, while others won’t go into effect until August 1, 2014.

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Maryland law on accommodations for pregnant workers takes effect October 1

September 12, 2013 0 COMMENTS

by Kevin C. McCormick

Maryland’s Reasonable Accommodations for Pregnant Workers Act goes into effect October 1, meaning Maryland employers with 15 or more employees must provide reasonable accommodations to employees who experience a disability because of a pregnancy.

Basically, the new law requires employers to treat pregnancies in much the same way disabilities covered by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) are handled. Accommodations are required unless they would impose an undue hardship on the employer.

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