House passes comp time bill; White House voices support

May 04, 2017 0 COMMENTS

The U.S. House of Representatives has passed a bill that would allow private employers to offer workers compensatory time off in lieu of overtime pay.

The Working Families Flexibility Act of 2017 will now go to the Senate. However, despite having the White House’s support, the bill could face obstacles.

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Texas AFL-CIO seeks to join fight to save overtime rules

December 21, 2016 0 COMMENTS

A group of labor organizations is attempting to save the new overtime rules from almost certain death under the Trump administration.

The Texas AFL-CIO on December 9 moved to join a lawsuit challenging the rules, saying that if the president-elect drops the government’s defense of the regulation as predicted, the union group will see it through.

Background

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Court expedites appeal of overtime rule injunction

December 09, 2016 0 COMMENTS

A federal appeals court will review the temporary injunction blocking new overtime regulations on an expedited schedule that wraps things up even faster than the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) had requested. But it still won’t reach a decision until after President-elect Donald Trump’s inauguration, and that could mean the end of the overtime rule, according to some experts.

The U.S. 5th Circuit Court of Appeals granted the DOL’s motion for expedited review December 8. The court scheduled most briefing deadlines as the DOL had requested, but it slated final briefs for January 31 rather than the proposed February 7.

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DOL appeals overtime rule injunction

December 02, 2016 0 COMMENTS

The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) announced on December 1 that it will appeal a court’s injunction temporarily halting its new overtime regulations.

A federal judge for the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Texas blocked the rules on November 22, calling the regulations “unlawful” and noting that the changes in the rules should be left to Congress.

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Texas federal court fast-tracks suit challenging DOL’s overtime rule

October 20, 2016 0 COMMENTS

Update: A ruling on the November 16 injunction hearing is expected on November 22. We will provide coverage on the ruling once it is issued.

A federal district court has agreed to fast-track a lawsuit challenging the U.S. Department of Labor’s (DOL) new overtime regulation. The court has scheduled oral arguments for November 16, just two weeks ahead of the rule’s December 1 effective date.

The rule will more than double the salary threshold for employees. Employees earning less than $913 per week ($47,476 annually) will have to be classified as nonexempt from the Fair Labor Standards Act’s (FLSA) overtime requirements, regardless of whether they meet any of the duties tests.

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Employers need to be ready for new overtime rule by December 1

May 18, 2016 2 COMMENTS

The flurry of speculation is finally over. The White House and the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) have released the new final rule governing which workers must be paid overtime. The changes aren’t quite as drastic as what employers were preparing for based on the contents of the proposed rule made public last summer, but the final rule more than doubles the amount workers must earn to qualify as exempt from the law’s overtime pay requirement.  3D Man Overtime Clock

The changes mean some 4.2 million more employees across the country, according to White House estimates, will be eligible to earn overtime pay when the new final rule takes effect on December 1.

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DOL poised to release new overtime final rule

May 17, 2016 0 COMMENTS

The long-awaited final rule making millions more employees eligible to earn overtime pay is likely to be released on May 18, and if its contents match recent reports, employers and employees alike are in for big changes.

The Politico news organization reports that Vice President Joe Biden, Labor Secretary Tom Perez, and Ohio Senator Sherrod Brown will announce the rule at an event in Columbus, Ohio, on May 18. The report says the rule places the minimum salary for an employee to maintain exempt status at $47,500, up from the current rule’s floor of $455 a week ($23,660 a year).

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New FLSA overtime rule a step closer to reality

March 16, 2016 0 COMMENTS

The U.S. Department of Labor’s (DOL) proposed rule greatly expanding the number of workers eligible for overtime pay has been submitted to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review, a necessary step before the rule can be finalized.

The new rule is expected to make nearly five million workers lose their exempt status under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), according to the DOL, meaning they would be eligible for overtime pay at no less than 1½ times their normal rate of pay for all hours worked over 40 in a workweek.

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Enforcement of DOL home healthcare rule starts November 12

November 10, 2015 0 COMMENTS

by Judith E. Kramer

November 12 marks the date the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) will begin enforcing regulations extending the minimum wage and overtime protections of the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) to almost two million home healthcare workers who are employed by third parties and provide either companionship services or live-in care for the elderly, ill, or disabled.

The DOL issued the regulations on October 1, 2013, but a federal district court held them invalid. Then the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit disagreed, holding on August 21, 2015, that they are a reasonable interpretation of the FLSA.

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New Connecticut law makes wage infractions more dangerous

September 24, 2015 0 COMMENTS

by John Herrington

A new Connecticut law taking effect October 1 requires courts to award double damages plus court costs and attorneys’ fees for most employee wage claims.

Under the new law—Public Act 15-86, the “Act Concerning an Employer’s Failure to Pay Wages”—a court must award, as a baseline default, double damages plus court costs and attorneys’ fees if it finds that an employer has (1) failed to pay an employee’s wages, accrued fringe benefits, or arbitration award or (2) failed to meet the law’s requirements for an employee’s minimum wage or overtime rates.

Before the new law, which applies to all Connecticut employers, courts consistently held that awards for double damages and attorneys’ fees required the employee to establish facts sufficient to support a finding of bad faith, arbitrariness, or unreasonableness by the employer. Under the new law, that burden shifts from employees to employers.

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