Overtime law changing for Oregon manufacturing employers

December 06, 2017 0 COMMENTS

by Cal Keith

Much of a new law affecting overtime pay in mills, factories, and manufacturing facilities in Oregon will take effect on January 1.

In most circumstances, employers in Oregon must pay overtime wages after an employee has worked 40 hours in a week, but mills, factories, and manufacturing facilities also face a daily overtime requirement after 10 hours. In December 2016, the Oregon Bureau of Labor and Industries (BOLI) changed its long-established interpretation of overtime rules for mills, factories, and manufacturing facilities to require employers to sometimes pay more overtime than under the previous interpretation.

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January 1 is key date for New York paid family leave law

December 05, 2017 0 COMMENTS

Diversity Insight paid family leaveby Angelo D. Catalano

Employers in New York need to be ready to provide paid family leave (PFL) to eligible employees as of January 1.

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Right-to-work advocates dealt blow in Missouri

August 28, 2017 0 COMMENTS

by Tammy Binford

Missouri’s new right-to-work law, which was supposed to take effect August 28, is on hold after opponents of the measure submitted petitions to put the law up for a voter referendum in November.

The state legislature passed the law, and Governor Eric Greitens signed it in February, but on August 18, unions and other opponents of the measure conducted a petition drive in an effort to put it on the November ballot.

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Missouri right-to-work law set to take effect

August 14, 2017 0 COMMENTS

by Bob Kaiser, Daniel O’Toole, and Jeremy Brenner

Missouri’s right-to-work law will take effect on August 28. The law was passed by the legislature and signed by Governor Eric Greitens in February.

Here are some key provisions of the law: read more…

Tip-sharing law set to take effect in New Hampshire

August 08, 2017 0 COMMENTS

by Jim Reidy

A New Hampshire law set to take effect September 3 makes clear that employees who receive tips may pool their tips and share them with coworkers who don’t receive tips. For example, restaurant servers will be free to share tips with hosts and hostesses.

Even though Senate Bill 37, which was signed by Governor Chris Sununu on July 5, allows tip sharing, employers won’t be allowed to require employees to participate in a tip-sharing arrangement, just as employers may not require employees who receive tips to share tips with each other now. Employees must participate in tip-sharing arrangements voluntarily and “without coercion.”

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Employer-friendly changes on the way for Missouri’s antidiscrimination law

August 07, 2017 0 COMMENTS

by Daniel K. O’Toole

Changes seen as making the Missouri Human Rights Act (MHRA) more “employer-friendly” are set to take effect on August 28.

One of the changes will eliminate individual liability for supervisors and specify that only employers may be held liable for discrimination. The previous law allowed employees alleging discrimination to sue both the employer and any supervisory employee who allegedly discriminated against them.

Also, the new law excludes any entity that is owned or operated by a religious organization from the definition of “employer.” The change will presumably exclude from suit, for example, entities such as religious charities or hospitals operated by religious orders. Under previous law, entities were exempt if they were owned and operated by a religious order, which became a difficult standard to meet.

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Changes to Iowa unemployment benefits coming July 1

June 20, 2017 0 COMMENTS

by Tara Z. Hall

Several changes related to unemployment benefits in Iowa are set to take effect July 1. The changes are seen as beneficial to employers.

Unemployment and incarceration

An amendment to the Iowa Employment Security Act (IESA) adds a new subsection to the Iowa Code that provides that an employee will be disqualified from receiving benefits if he misses work because of incarceration unless the following four factors are satisfied: read more…

Iowa workers’ comp changes coming July 1

June 15, 2017 0 COMMENTS

by Tara Hall and Rebecca Duffy

Changes to Iowa’s workers’ compensation law—changes seen as mostly beneficial to employers—are set to take effect July 1.

The employer-friendly changes to the state’s workers’ comp law include a new provision classifying shoulder injuries as scheduled-member injuries rather than body-as-a-whole injuries, which force an industrial disability analysis. Another change limits compensation for body-as-a-whole injuries to functional disability when the employee returns to work or is offered work at the same or higher pay than he earned at the time of the injury. Another employer-friendly provision places burdens regarding an offer of suitable work on both the employer and the employee.

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Paid sick leave laws for Chicago-area workers take effect July 1

June 05, 2017 0 COMMENTS

by Steven L. Brenneman

Most employers in Chicago and Cook County will be required to offer paid sick leave beginning July 1. The city of Chicago passed a sick leave ordinance last summer, and Cook County (where Chicago is located) passed a nearly identical law in October. The ordinances apply to all businesses that are located in the city or county or are subject to city licensing requirements (except for employers in the construction industry).

The laws require employers, regardless of size, to provide all employees who work at least 80 hours in a 120-day period with one hour of paid sick leave for every 40 hours worked, up to 40 hours of leave per year. Employees are allowed to carry half of their unused accrued paid sick leave (up to 20 hours) to the next year. In addition, employers that are subject to the federal Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) must allow FMLA-eligible employees to carry over up to 40 additional hours of accrued paid sick leave to use exclusively for FMLA-qualifying purposes.

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CBO says revised AHCA not much of an improvement over prior version

May 25, 2017 0 COMMENTS

The saga of the American Health Care Act (AHCA), the Republican plan to repeal and replace key portions of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), has been a long and winding one so far.

To recap: The original version of the AHCA was introduced in early March. After receiving lukewarm support and a discouraging report from the Congressional Budget Office (CBO), which concluded that it would leave an additional 24 million Americans uninsured by 2026 as compared with the current ACA, it was pulled from the House floor shortly before a scheduled vote on March 24.

Republican lawmakers regrouped, and on May 4, a modified version of the AHCA squeaked through the House by the slimmest of margins. The vote took place before the CBO had a chance to review the new version of the bill.

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