DOL poised to release new overtime final rule

May 17, 2016 0 COMMENTS

The long-awaited final rule making millions more employees eligible to earn overtime pay is likely to be released on May 18, and if its contents match recent reports, employers and employees alike are in for big changes.

The Politico news organization reports that Vice President Joe Biden, Labor Secretary Tom Perez, and Ohio Senator Sherrod Brown will announce the rule at an event in Columbus, Ohio, on May 18. The report says the rule places the minimum salary for an employee to maintain exempt status at $47,500, up from the current rule’s floor of $455 a week ($23,660 a year).

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Proposed rule spells out paid sick leave requirements for federal contractors

February 25, 2016 0 COMMENTS

by Tammy Binford

The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) has released its proposed regulations implementing President Barack Obama’s Executive Order requiring paid sick leave for employees of federal contractors.

Executive Order 13706, signed on September 7, 2015, will apply to new contracts and replacements for expiring contracts that result from solicitations issued on or after January 1, 2017, or that are awarded outside the solicitation process on or after January 1, 2017.

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Sears Settlement with EEOC Raises New Concerns on ADA Enforcement

September 30, 2009 0 COMMENTS

by Burton J. Fishman

Sears recently reached a $6.2 million settlement with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) regarding Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) violations stemming from the company’s alleged refusal to return injured workers to the job. This is the largest ADA settlement in a single lawsuit in EEOC history. More aggressive enforcement has been promised by the Obama administration across the civil rights/employment discrimination front; this appears to be a product of that new policy.

At the root of the EEOC’s allegations was an “inflexible” workers’ compensation leave policy that had the effect of terminating employees rather than seeking and/or arriving at a reasonable accommodation that would yield a return to work. Although only one employee filed a charge, the EEOC claims that pretrial discovery revealed that hundreds of other employees who had taken workers’ comp leave were also terminated without regard for a return to work or an extended leave under the Americans with Disabilities Act.

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