New provisions of New Hampshire’s equal pay law take effect January 1

by Jeanine Poole

Eight sections of New Hampshire’s Protective Legislation (RSA 275:37, 38, 38-a, 40, 41-a, 41-b, 41-c, and 41-d) will be modified effective January 1, 2015. RSA 275:37 will prohibit employers and persons seeking employees from discriminating between employees on the basis of sex by paying employees of one sex less than employees of the other sex for equal work that (1) requires equal skill, effort, and responsibility and (2) is performed under similar working conditions.

There are exceptions that permit different wage rates when the different payment is made pursuant to: read more…

Categories: New Hampshire

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Part of once-delayed ACA employer mandate takes effect January 1

by Douglas R. Chamberlain

Employers got a reprieve in 2014 on a key mandate incorporated in the Affordable Care Act (ACA), but the new effective date for many employers is now set for January 1, 2015.

The ACA generally provides that all employers with 50 or more employees who work 30 or more hours per week must offer their employees health insurance coverage. This “employer mandate” was originally slated to take effect January 1, 2014, but during 2013, the Obama administration delayed the effective date to 2015.

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New Hampshire social media privacy law takes effect September 30

by Jeanine Poole

New Hampshire employers need to be reviewing their policies regarding employee use of social media and electronic equipment now that a new law protecting employee privacy is set to take effect September 30.

The new law prohibits New Hampshire employers from requesting or requiring current or prospective employees to disclose some information related to their personal social media accounts. The law defines “personal account” as “an account, service, or profile on a social networking website that is used by a current or prospective employee primarily for personal communications unrelated to any business purpose of the employer.”

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Drug-free healthcare facility law takes effect in New Hampshire

by Gregory L. Silverman

A New Hampshire law taking effect August 25 requires healthcare employers to take action against substance abuse in their facilities.

The new law requires all hospitals, home healthcare providers, outpatient rehabilitation clinics, ambulatory surgery centers, urgent care centers, nursing homes, assisted living facilities, adult daycare centers, birthing centers, dialysis centers, and hospice facilities to “adopt a policy establishing procedures for prevention, detection, and resolution of controlled substance abuse, misuse, and diversion.”

The policy must address certain procedures, including: read more…

New Hampshire new-hire reporting requirements changing August 3

by Heather L. Devine

New Hampshire House Bill 440, which made several changes and clarifications to new-hire reporting requirements, goes into effect August 3. Most important, the new law requires employers to complete a new-hire report to the Department of Employment Security when a former employee has been rehired (regardless of whether she was laid off or terminated) and when an employee or independent contractor has been separated from her employment for 60 consecutive days or more (rather than 26 consecutive weeks under the prior version of the law).

The full text of HB 440 can be found here. Additional information on the change can be found here.

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Scam alert! NHES warns of e-mail identity theft con

by Christopher J. Pyles

New Hampshire Employment Security (NHES) has recently become aware of an identity theft scam being directed at employers. NHES is warning that e-mails coming from an address ending in “@detma.org” and using a subject line referring to “time-sensitive material” are being sent to businesses in an effort to obtain employees’ wage and separation information. The fake e-mails seem to be from an administrative agency, but they aren’t. NHES states that it doesn’t seek information in that manner and that such e-mails should be ignored.

The full text of the alert and a sample scam e-mail may be found here. Employers, beware!

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Employer access to personal social media accounts may soon be off-limits in New Hampshire

by Jay Surdukowski
Sulloway & Hollis, P.L.L.C.

On Thursday, June 6, the New Hampshire Senate approved a bill to protect the privacy of employees’ social media accounts such as Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn. But Republicans tacked on an amendment that may doom the bill in the house.

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New year brings changes to New Hampshire employer safety programs

by Jeanine Poole

New Hampshire’s requirements for employer safety programs are changing. Passed in June, House Bill 1587 goes into effect on January 1, 2013. The new law provides:

  • Employers with 15 or more employees (formerly 10 or more employees) must have a written safety program filed with the New Hampshire Department of Labor (NHDOL).
  • Once filed, the program must be updated and filed with the NHDOL every two years (formerly biennially on January 1).
  • Employers with 15 or more employees (formerly five or more employees) must establish a joint loss safety committee.
  • The NHDOL can assess administrative penalties up to $250 (formerly $1,000) per day for each day of noncompliance.
  • The workers’ compensation safety inspection fund is repealed. Collected penalties now go to the state’s general fund.

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Rules changing on New Hampshire noncompete, nonpiracy agreements

New Hampshire flagBy Jeanine Poole

New Hampshire employers using noncompete and nonpiracy agreements face new limits beginning July 14. That’s when House Bill 1270 goes into effect.

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Categories: New Hampshire

Employers: “Full Speed Ahead” on Healthcare Reform

June 28, 2012 - by: HR Hero 2 COMMENTS

U.S. Supreme Court BuildingBy Douglas R. Chamberlain
Sulloway & Hollis, P.L.L.C.

The U.S. Supreme Court’s historic decision on healthcare reform (also known as the Affordable Care Act, or ACA) will be dissected and argued about for many years to come. The Court essentially upheld all the key elements of the healthcare reform law — most notably the so-called “individual mandate,” which will require that individuals purchase health insurance or else pay a penalty (or “tax”). There are two surprising elements to the Court’s decision: read more…

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