Another New Jersey city requires paid sick time

by Michael H. Dell

Morristown has joined the list of New Jersey cities that require employers to provide paid sick time to employees. Employers in Morristown have until January 11 to come into compliance with the city’s paid sick time ordinance, which was passed in September.

Under the ordinance, employers with 10 or more employees in Morristown must provide up to 40 hours of paid sick time, while employers with nine or fewer employees in the city must provide up to 25 hours of paid sick time. In determining the number of employees it has, an employer must count full-time, part-time, and temporary employees.

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New Arizona minimum wage goes into effect January 1

by Dinita L. James
Gonzalez Law, LLC

The minimum wage in Arizona will jump from $8.05 to $10 on January 1 as a result of the passage of Proposition 206 in November.

A last-minute barrage of litigation by the Arizona Chamber of Commerce and Industry failed to block the increase from taking effect. On December 29, the Arizona Supreme Court entered a one-sentence order refusing to put the increase on hold.

Under the new law, the minimum wage will increase each year until it reaches $12 per hour in 2020. Employers can take a tip credit of up to $3 per hour for tips earned by workers who regularly and customarily receive tips.

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New York adopts higher salary thresholds for exempt employees

by Charles H. Kaplan
Sills Cummis & Gross P.C.

Employers in New York must increase the salaries of exempt executive and administrative employees by December 31 to meet the requirements of recently adopted regulations. Employers also must decide whether to increase exempt employees’ salaries each year to match annual increases required by the new regulations.

On December 28, the New York State Department of Labor (NYSDOL) adopted regulations that will increase the minimum salary thresholds for executive and administrative employees under the wage and hour provisions of New York state’s Labor Law. The Labor Law does not require a minimum salary for exempt professional employees.

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Florida minimum wage increasing to $8.10 on January 1

by Lisa Berg
Stearns Weaver Miller Weissler Alhadeff & Sitterson, P.A.

The minimum wage in Florida is set to go up five cents to $8.10 an hour on January 1. The current hourly minimum wage is $8.05. The increase is based on the percentage increase in the federal Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers in the South Region for the 12-month period prior to September 1, 2016.

Restaurant and hotel employers that take a tip credit may still take a credit of up to $3.02 per hour against the new minimum wage, meaning tipped employees must receive direct wages of at least $5.08 per hour starting January 1.

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New Illinois law bans noncompetition agreements for low-wage workers

by Steven L. Brenneman

The Illinois Freedom to Work Act, which will ban noncompetition agreements for low-wage private-sector employees, goes into effect on January 1.

The law defines a “low-wage employee” as an employee who earns the greater of the applicable federal, state, or local minimum wage or $13 per hour. Therefore, the law initially will apply to noncompetition agreements with employees earning $13 per hour or less.

The law defines “covenant not to compete” broadly to mean an agreement between an employer and a low-wage employee that restricts the employee from performing: read more…

Texas AFL-CIO seeks to join fight to save overtime rules

December 21, 2016 - by: Kate McGovern Tornone 0 COMMENTS

A group of labor organizations is attempting to save the new overtime rules from almost certain death under the Trump administration.

The Texas AFL-CIO on December 9 moved to join a lawsuit challenging the rules, saying that if the president-elect drops the government’s defense of the regulation as predicted, the union group will see it through.

Background

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California Equal Pay Act expansion takes effect January 1

by Cathleen S. Yonahara
Freeland Cooper & Foreman LLP

California’s equal pay law will provide protections for race and ethnicity as well as gender as of January 1, 2017.

Since 1949, California law has prohibited gender-based wage discrimination, and in 2015, that protection was expanded to require equal pay for men and women who perform “substantially similar” work for an employer regardless of their location and to place the burden of proof on the employer to demonstrate that any pay gap is due to nondiscriminatory factors.

Effective January 1, the law also will protect employees from disparities in pay based on ethnicity. The new prohibitions on wage differentials based on ethnicity track the prohibitions on wage differentials based on gender. The employer bears the burden of proving that a wage differential is based on: read more…

New law gives employees in Colorado access to personnel files

by Brad Williams

A new state law going into effect January 1 requires most private-sector employers in Colorado to allow employees to inspect and copy their personnel files at least annually upon request. The new law also grants former employees the right to inspect their personnel files once after the termination of their employment.

The law doesn’t require employers to create or keep personnel files for current or former employees. Also, employers aren’t required to retain any particular documents that are or were in an employee’s personnel file for any particular period of time. However, if a personnel file exists when an employee asks to inspect it, the employer must allow access.

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New York minimum wage going up on December 31

December 14, 2016 - by: Tammy Binford 0 COMMENTS

The first of a series of increases intended to bring New York’s state minimum wage to $15 an hour is set to go into effect on December 31.

As a result of a measure signed into law in April, the state will see minimum wage increases implemented on a regional basis. The state’s current basic minimum wage is $9 an hour.

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Categories: HR Hero Alerts / Minimum Wage / New York

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California’s minimum wage going up on January 1

December 12, 2016 - by: Tammy Binford 0 COMMENTS

The minimum wage in California will rise to $10.50 an hour on January 1 for most employers thanks to a measure signed into law in April. Future incremental increases will put the state’s minimum wage at $15 an hour by January 2022 for employers with 26 or more employees. Smaller employers will have more time to reach the eventual $15 level.

The current minimum wage in California is $10 an hour. Under the new law, employers with 26 or more employees will see the minimum wage go to $10.50 on January 1, 2017.

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