California employers must adjust to new laws on leave, pay, criminal history

Pay equity, parental leave, and criminal history are hot topics that have been grabbing attention for some time, and employers in California now need to prepare for three newly signed laws addressing those issues.

The new laws include restrictions on employers asking applicants questions related to salary history and criminal history and impose new parental leave requirements on small employers.

read more…

New law bans New York City employers from asking for salary history

by Charles H. Kaplan and Theresa M. Levine

Employers in New York City will be prohibited from asking applicants about their previous salary when an amendment to the New York City Human Rights Law (NYCHRL) goes into effect on October 31.

The amendment prohibits employers from asking about applicants’ wages, salaries, benefits, and other compensation history during the process of hiring or negotiating an employment contract. Also, the amendment prohibits employers from asking an applicant’s current or prior employer about wages and makes it unlawful for an employer to search publicly available records or reports to obtain an applicant’s salary history.

read more…

Montana minimum wage to increase to $8.30 on January 1

by Jason S. Ritchie

On September 29, the Montana Department of Labor and Industry (DOLI) announced that the Montana minimum wage will rise to $8.30 per hour on January 1, 2018. Under Montana law, the DOLI is required to annually review the Consumer Price Index and adjust the state minimum wage to reflect increases in the cost of living. The DOLI recently completed its annual review, and Montana workers who earn minimum wage will see an increase from $8.15 per hour to $8.30 per hour on January 1.

Jason Ritchie is the editor of Montana Employment Law Letter and a partner with Ritchie Manning LLP in Billings. You can reach him at jritchie@ritchiemanning.com.

Right-to-work advocates dealt blow in Missouri

August 28, 2017 - by: Tammy Binford 0 COMMENTS

by Tammy Binford

Missouri’s new right-to-work law, which was supposed to take effect August 28, is on hold after opponents of the measure submitted petitions to put the law up for a voter referendum in November.

The state legislature passed the law, and Governor Eric Greitens signed it in February, but on August 18, unions and other opponents of the measure conducted a petition drive in an effort to put it on the November ballot.

read more…

Missouri right-to-work law set to take effect

by Bob Kaiser, Daniel O’Toole, and Jeremy Brenner

Missouri’s right-to-work law will take effect on August 28. The law was passed by the legislature and signed by Governor Eric Greitens in February.

Here are some key provisions of the law: read more…

Tip-sharing law set to take effect in New Hampshire

by Jim Reidy

A New Hampshire law set to take effect September 3 makes clear that employees who receive tips may pool their tips and share them with coworkers who don’t receive tips. For example, restaurant servers will be free to share tips with hosts and hostesses.

Even though Senate Bill 37, which was signed by Governor Chris Sununu on July 5, allows tip sharing, employers won’t be allowed to require employees to participate in a tip-sharing arrangement, just as employers may not require employees who receive tips to share tips with each other now. Employees must participate in tip-sharing arrangements voluntarily and “without coercion.”

read more…

UAW’s effort to unionize Mississippi Nissan workers fails

by Martin J. RegimbalMartin Regimbal 1 column

Workers at the Nissan auto plant in Canton, Mississippi, rejected a unionization effort by the United Auto Workers (UAW) on August 3-4, leaving intact the union’s record of unsuccessful organizing attempts at foreign-owned auto plants in the South.

read more…

Employer-friendly changes on the way for Missouri’s antidiscrimination law

by Daniel K. O’Toole

Changes seen as making the Missouri Human Rights Act (MHRA) more “employer-friendly” are set to take effect on August 28.

One of the changes will eliminate individual liability for supervisors and specify that only employers may be held liable for discrimination. The previous law allowed employees alleging discrimination to sue both the employer and any supervisory employee who allegedly discriminated against them.

Also, the new law excludes any entity that is owned or operated by a religious organization from the definition of “employer.” The change will presumably exclude from suit, for example, entities such as religious charities or hospitals operated by religious orders. Under previous law, entities were exempt if they were owned and operated by a religious order, which became a difficult standard to meet.

read more…

Massachusetts ruling opens door to discrimination suits over medical marijuana

Hero Line marijuanaby Erica E. Flores

A new ruling from the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court should be a warning to employers in the state that refuse to tolerate medical marijuana use by employees with a disability.

read more…

Texas Supreme Court balks at extending spousal benefits to same-sex couples

by Jacob Monty
Monty & Ramirez, LLP

The Texas Supreme Court ruled this week that the City of Houston’s extension of its employee benefits to married same-sex couples goes further than is required by the 2015 U.S. Supreme Court’s landmark decision in Obergefell v. Hodges, which declared same-sex marriage equal in all 50 states. The plaintiffs in Friday’s decision argued that Obergefell didn’t impose on taxpayers the obligation to “subsidize” same-sex marriage. The city argued that the Supreme Court ruling requires it to treat employees in same-sex marriage equally.

In what same-sex marriage opponents are calling a victory, the Texas Supreme Court sent the case back to the lower court for arguments to be made in light of Obergefell, which was announced only after the parties had briefed the case in the lower court. The court stated: read more…

 Page 1 of 44  1  2  3  4  5 » ...  Last »