Employers’ flu worries go beyond germs, attendance

January 17, 2018 - by: Tammy Binford 0 COMMENTS

This year’s influenza outbreak has sickened millions of people across the country, leaving employers struggling to cover for employees who are out sick and searching for ways to prevent others from coming down with the flu. But dealing with germ control and sick days is only the beginning. Legal issues also can come into play.Flu concerns

This season’s flu virus is more widespread than usual, according to information from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and it’s hitting children and young adults harder than usual. The CDC reported that as of the week ending January 6, 2018, the number of child fatalities attributed to this season’s flu outbreak hit 20. The CDC’s report for the week ending January 6 also showed “widespread” flu activity in every state but Hawaii, where flu activity was described as “regional.”

read more…

DOL’s reissuance of 17 opinion letters called step in right direction

January 11, 2018 - by: Tammy Binford 0 COMMENTS

The U.S. Department of Labor’s (DOL) decision to reissue 17 opinion letters first issued during the George W. Bush administration is a welcome move and “a step in the right direction,” according to an attorney who represents employers.

On January 5, the DOL announced that it was reissuing the opinion letters. The move follows the DOL’s announcement last summer that it was returning to the practice of issuing opinion letters, a practice that was discontinued during the Obama administration in favor of issuing “administrative interpretations” of the DOL’s views on issues related to laws and regulations enforced by the department’s Wage and Hour Division (WHD).

read more…

New policy on internships puts DOL, courts on same page

January 09, 2018 - by: Tammy Binford 0 COMMENTS

EntertainHR intern movieThe U.S. Department of Labor’s (DOL) announcement that it is nixing its 2010 guidance on unpaid internships in favor of a less-rigid test puts the agency in line with recent appellate court rulings on the issue, according to an attorney following the matter.

Matthew H. Parker, an editor of Rhode Island Employment Law Letter and attorney with Whelan, Corrente, Flanders, Kinder & Siket LLP in Providence, Rhode Island, says the new policy isn’t “a sea change in how to classify interns” but does align the DOL’s standard with recent appellate court rulings.

read more…

Latest NLRB reversal takes aim at ‘microunits’

December 19, 2017 - by: Tammy Binford 0 COMMENTS

NLRB logoThe latest National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) decision reversing actions by the Obama-era Board hands employers a win against an organizing tactic that gave unions the upper hand in determining what constitutes an appropriate bargaining unit. As was the case with other mid-December decisions, the Board turned the old standard into the new standard.

On December 15, the Board issued a 3-2 party-line decision reversing the 2011 Specialty Healthcare decision, which opened the door for unions seeking to organize “microunits.” The decision reining in microunit unionization efforts was the latest in a flurry of NLRB activity undertaken just before Republican Philip Miscimarra’s term expired on December 16. Other recent decisions struck a blow against the “quickie” union election rule and reversed a decision affecting employee handbooks and another related to the “reasonableness” settlement standard in single-employer claims.

read more…

New Executive Order seeks to expand health insurance options

October 12, 2017 - by: HR Hero 0 COMMENTS

After several failed legislative attempts to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA), President Donald Trump is now taking matters into his own hands.

On October 12, Trump signed a new Executive Order (EO) designed to “expand choices and alternatives to Obamacare plans and increase competition to bring down costs for consumers,” according to a White House press release.

read more…

Time running out to comment on long-stalled overtime rule

September 14, 2017 - by: Tammy Binford 0 COMMENTS

HR News Overtime Rule NearsEmployers and others have until September 25 to submit comments to shape the rule governing which workers are eligible for overtime pay. Once the deadline passes, employers will face a waiting game before learning what changes may be in store.

In late July, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) announced it was soliciting comments through a Request for Information (RFI) dealing with the long-stalled and much-debated rule aimed at raising the salary threshold in the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) so that more workers will be eligible for overtime pay.

read more…

DOL seeking feedback on long-debated overtime rule

July 25, 2017 - by: Tammy Binford 0 COMMENTS

Overtime snipEmployers will get the opportunity to offer feedback on changes to the regulation governing which workers are eligible for overtime pay after the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) publishes a Request for Information (RFI) in the Federal Register on July 26.

On July 25, the DOL announced it would publish the RFI and released a preliminary copy. The RFI is the latest action on a rule issued in May 2016 during the Obama administration. Implementation of the rule would have added approximately 4.2 million employees to the ranks of workers eligible for overtime pay of at least 1½ times their regular rate of pay for hours worked in excess of 40 in a workweek.

read more…

DOL drops defense of overtime rules

June 30, 2017 - by: HR Hero 0 COMMENTS

by Susan Prince, JD, MSL

The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL), headed by new Secretary of Labor Alexander Acosta, has decided not to defend the overtime rules finalized under the Obama administration. Instead, the DOL will seek to begin a new rulemaking process, likely with a lower salary threshold for overtime exemptions.

Background

read more…

DOL rescinds joint-employment, independent contractor guidance

The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) has withdrawn two major Obama-era guidance documents, one addressing joint employment and one dealing with independent contractors.

The move, while not a surprise, is good news for employers, according to H. Juanita Beecher, an attorney with Fortney & Scott and editor of Federal Employment Law Insider. The Obama administration tried to find a way to deal with shifting employer-employee relationships, she said. The effort included a focus on outsourcing and the use of staffing companies as well as a big push to examine whether independent contractors were actually employees. By rescinding the guidance documents, the DOL is backing off its “aggressive” initiative, Beecher said.

read more…

Signaling end of overtime rule, DOL will seek public input on new regs

On June 7, Secretary of Labor Alexander Acosta said he will soon formally request the public’s input on new overtime regulations. The announcement signals that the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) likely will drop its defense of former President Barack Obama’s overtime rule, according to one expert.

A request for information (RFI) likely will be filed with the White House’s Office of Management and Budget (OMB) in the next two to three weeks, Acosta told lawmakers during a budget hearing of the House of Representatives’ Committee on Appropriations.

read more…

 Page 1 of 14  1  2  3  4  5 » ...  Last »