Advocacy groups challenge Trump’s 2-for-1 regulation requirement

February 09, 2017 - by: Kate McGovern Tornone 0 COMMENTS

Three liberal advocacy groups have filed a lawsuit alleging that President Donald Trump’s 2-for-1 regulation mandate violates the U.S. Constitution and directs agencies to violate federal law.

In a January 30 Executive Order, Trump instructed federal agencies to cut two regulations for every new one issued during the current fiscal year. He said the order is aimed at alleviating the regulatory burdens businesses face.

Now, consumer group Public Citizen is challenging the Executive Order, joined by the Natural Resources Defense Council and the Communications Workers of America. In a February 8 complaint, the groups alleged the order violates the Constitution and requires federal agencies to violate both the laws they implement and the Administrative Procedure Act.

read more…

Republican ACA proposal poses challenges for multistate employers

January 25, 2017 - by: Kate McGovern Tornone 0 COMMENTS

A group of Republican senators has proposed a replacement bill for the Affordable Care Act (ACA) that would allow states to choose whether to keep Obamacare’s provisions in place. Because employers’ requirements would depend on where employees work, compliance could be a real challenge for companies with operations in multiple states, according to the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM).

The bill is seemingly an attempt to gain bipartisan support, but lawmakers on both sides have expressed dissatisfaction with its provisions, said Chatrane Birbal, SHRM’s senior adviser for government relations.

read more…

Trump takes aim at ACA on first day in office

January 23, 2017 - by: Kate McGovern Tornone 0 COMMENTS

Following his inauguration on January 20, President Donald Trump signed his first round of Executive Orders, including one directing federal agencies to ease enforcement of some Affordable Care Act (ACA) requirements.

Trump told agencies to “waive, defer, grant exemptions from, or delay the implementation of”ACA provisions that impose fees or other burdens on a range of stakeholders, including individuals and health insurers.

read more…

Puzder hearing set for January, Dems defend overtime rules

December 28, 2016 - by: Kate McGovern Tornone 0 COMMENTS

The Senate has scheduled a January confirmation hearing for President-elect Donald Trump’s pick for secretary of labor.

Trump’s nomination of Andy Puzder, CEO of CKE Restaurants, was the death knell for the U.S. Department of Labor’s (DOL) new Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) overtime regulations, according to John Husband, a partner at Holland & Hart in Denver and an editor of Colorado Employment Law Letter.

It already was expected that the Trump DOL would withdraw the department’s appeal of an injunction blocking the rules, but Puzder’s nomination solidified that prediction, Husband previously said.

read more…

Movement on overtime rules unlikely before Trump takes office

December 06, 2016 - by: Kate McGovern Tornone 0 COMMENTS

The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) has requested that an appeals court fast-track its appeal of an injunction blocking the new overtime regulations. But even if the court agrees to the DOL’s proposed expedited schedule, it wouldn’t take action on the injunction until at least February, weeks after President-elect Donald Trump takes office.

The department filed an appeal with the U.S. 5th Circuit Court of Appeals on December 1. It argued that a federal district court judge’s injunction halting the rules “rests on an error of law and should be reversed.” The judge called into question the DOL’s authority to establish a salary basis test for overtime eligibility under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). In its appeal, the DOL argues that the 5th Circuit has already sanctioned the test in previous opinions.

read more…

With Trump win, many employment initiatives in question

November 09, 2016 - by: Kate McGovern Tornone 0 COMMENTS

Recent employment initiatives undertaken by the Obama administration could be in jeopardy under Donald Trump’s presidency, but employers still need to comply with those laws and regulations for now, says one expert.

“In general, things are going to be pretty unpredictable,” said Connor Beatty, an associate with Brann & Isaacson  in Maine and editor of Maine Employment Law Letter. Not only has Trump never held public office, but he’s also changed his position on issues several times, Beatty said.

read more…

States, business groups file suits to halt DOL’s overtime regs

September 21, 2016 - by: HR Hero Alerts 0 COMMENTS

by Kate McGovern Tornone

Twenty-one states and several employer interest groups filed lawsuits against the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) on September 20 alleging the agency’s new overtime regulations exceed its authority. The suits, however, are not expected to have any success in the near future, and employers would be well served to be in compliance by the December 1, 2016, deadline, according to one expert.

Background

read more…

White Paper on DOL’s new ‘blacklisting’ rule now available

Attorneys with Fortney & Scott, LLC, in Washington, D.C., who edit Federal Employment Law Insider, sprang into action after the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) issued final regulations on August 25 implementing the Fair Pay and Safe Workplaces Executive Order—often called the “blacklisting” rule. The controversial rule will require federal contractors and subcontractors to disclose purported violations of 14 federal laws (and their state-law equivalents) during the preceding three-year period when bidding on federal contracts worth more than $500,000.

To help readers and others who fall into that target group, Fortney & Scott’s Blacklisting Team has prepared a White Paper outlining the new obligations, along with suggestions on how to proceed. You may access the White Paper here. Following are some key points: read more…

Columbia University decision latest NLRB victory for unions

August 24, 2016 - by: Tammy Binford 0 COMMENTS

Colombia university campus groundsThe National Labor Relations Board’s (NLRB) ruling that graduate student assistants at private colleges and universities are entitled to unionize is the latest Board action seen as a boon to union interests.

In a 3-1 decision issued on August 23, the Board ruled that graduate assistants at Columbia University are employees as well as students and may therefore be represented by a union. The ruling overturns the 2004 Brown University decision that determined that students working as teaching and research assistants should be considered students, not employees.

read more…

Ruling gives employees more time to file constructive discharge claims

May 24, 2016 - by: Tammy Binford 0 COMMENTS

by Tammy Binford

A May 23 U.S. Supreme Court ruling clears up questions about how long employees have to file constructive discharge claims, and the decision likely means more pressure for employers potentially facing such lawsuits.

In Green v. Brennan, the Court ruled 7-1 that a U.S. Postal Service employee in Englewood, Colorado, filed a constructive discharge claim within the time period allowed for such claims. The employer had maintained that the claim came too late, and the lower courts agreed.

read more…

 Page 1 of 14  1  2  3  4  5 » ...  Last »