Voters to decide on Anchorage collective bargaining ordinance

by Tom Daniel

When voters in Anchorage go to the polls in November, they will decide the fate of a local ordinance that reins in the collective bargaining rights of municipal employees.

A referendum to repeal the local ordinance known as the Responsible Labor Act will be part of the November 4 ballot. The ordinance, proposed by Anchorage Mayor Dan Sullivan and approved by the Anchorage Assembly in a 6-5 vote in 2013, imposes limitations on the collective bargaining rights of municipal employees. The ordinance restricts the rights of municipal unions by:

  • Limiting union employees’ pay raises to one percent over the five-year average of the Alaska inflation rate;
  • Prohibiting strikes;
  • Eliminating binding arbitration when the city and a union reach an impasse over the terms of a new collective bargaining agreement (CBA), thus giving the city the authority to unilaterally implement its last offer;
  • Eliminating bonuses based on seniority or performance;
  • Introducing ‘”managed competition” by allowing the city to outsource some union jobs to private contractors; and
  • Limiting CBAs to a maximum of three years.

For more information on the referendum, see the April 2014 issue of Alaska Employment Law Letter.

AK_TomDanielTom Daniel is a partner with Perkins Coie LLP in Anchorage. He can be reached at tdaniel@perkinscoie.com.

About Alaska Employment Law Letter:
Excerpted from Alaska Employment Law Letter, and written by attorneys at the law firm of Perkins Coie. ALASKA EMPLOYMENT LAW LETTER is not intended to be and should not be used as a substitute for specific legal advice, since legal opinions may only be given in response to inquiries regarding specific factual situations. If legal advice is required, the services of counsel should be sought. Contact the attorneys at Perkins Coie.
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