ADA and Batman—by Robin

March 27, 2017 0 COMMENTS

Recently, Ben Affleck stepped down from directing the new Batman movie to focus on his recovery following recent treatment for alcoholism. His reason for stepping down was due to his belief that he was unable to give the directing role the focus and passion it requires.  Alcohol in the workplace

Alcoholism and drug addiction present complicated issues under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). The ADA protects “qualified individuals with disabilities” – individuals who can perform the essential functions of their position (or the position they are seeking) with or without reasonable accommodation. “Disability” is defined as a person who has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities, or has a record of such impairment.

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Developing a PIP that will make employees comeback heroes—Tom Brady style

February 07, 2017 0 COMMENTS

I’m sure you all watched or heard about the Super Bowl on Sunday night: Despite the fact that his team was trailing by 25 points, Patriots quarterback Tom Brady led New England on the greatest comeback in Super Bowl history. Brady’s season began with a four-game suspension for his involvement in the “deflategate” scandal and ended as Super Bowl MVP. It’s a comeback within a comeback. Despite not knowing much about sports, as a New Englander, I would be remiss if I let this opportunity pass without drawing some sort of analogy to HR. Because my law firm is based in Atlanta, I admit, I’m cowering just a little.  Patriots' parade in Boston for winning Super Bowl XLIX

As HR professionals, we are often called upon to assist managers in addressing concerns with employees who appear to be falling behind company expectations. How can we encourage employee “comebacks” and assist supervisors by providing effective tools to help employees to do so?

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“It’s not me, it’s you!” Seinfeld lessons on candid employee evaluations

July 27, 2015 0 COMMENTS

I confess, I’m a Seinfeld junkie. I’ve watched every episode multiple times and literally love every single oneeven the finale (I know, I know, I’m in the vast minority, but I’m committed, you could at least give me that). To this day, I watch Seinfeld’s re-runs over and over again, which I’m sure makes me cute in a geeky, boy-next-door kind of way, at least that’s what I tell myself. My wife just rolls her eyes and continues Facebooking, Tweeting, Instagramming, Pinteresting, Ashley Madisoning (actual users note recent security breach and structure assets accordingly), or whatever other social networking it is she does during my near daily half hour of “Ed time.” But irrespective of Seinfeld’s purported outdated-ness (likely not a word, but you’re smart, you understand), the fashions, Jerry’s updating (dating someone much hotter than you), or the fact that it is primarily intended for comedic purposes, employers can glean valuable lessons from Seinfeld if they watch closely.  Performance Evaluation

In Seinfeld episode number 140 (“The Fatigues”), Elaine, serving as interim company president while her boss is in Burma, is all set to can an employee for poor performance. Prior to meeting the employee, Elaine seems almost giddy to figuratively drop the guillotine on the unsuspecting employee. But once Elaine confronts the employee in person, Elaine can’t bring herself to do the deed, likely due to the fact that the employee is wearing fatigues, looks deranged, and has a spooky, guttural voice. Rather than deliver the news, Elaine promotes the employee from a mailroom position to a copywriter position.

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Avoiding the “own goal” at work: 3 lessons from Women’s World Cup

July 06, 2015 0 COMMENTS

On Sunday, the United States Women’s National Team (USWNT) soundly defeated Japan to claim the nation’s third World Cup championship. With this year’s Women’s World Cup breaking TV ratings expectations at every turn, it’s likely you or someone you know was glued to the tube as this spectacular victory unfolded. I know I was. And as I watched “el jogo bonito,” I was reminded of three simple lessons that translate well from the pitch to the office. Soccer World Cup

#1: Deal with the draw

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