If you can’t stand the heat, get out of the kitchen—best practices from Top Chef

August 14, 2017 - by: Rachel E. Kelly 0 COMMENTS
Rachel E. Kelly

“If you can’t stand the heat, get out of the kitchen!” That’s essentially what a group of Teamsters told Top Chef host personality Padma Lakshmi back in June 2014 outside of Steel & Rye restaurant in Milton, Massachusetts. This “episode” is now at the center of a lawsuit brought by the federal government against four Boston-area Teamsters accused of threatening Top Chef production into providing them with positions already held by nonunion employees.  On Strike Sign

The incident occurred in June 2014, when Lakshmi arrived at the restaurant for the filming of a Top Chef episode. Her van was met with a group of Teamsters, one of whom allegedly approached Lakshmi’s vehicle, reached in the passenger side window where she was sitting, and said, “Lookee here, what a pretty face.” Naturally, Lakshmi understood this to be a threat—or at least this is the theory of the attorneys prosecuting the case.

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Workin’ it in the library

July 25, 2013 - by: Jaclyn West 0 COMMENTS
Jaclyn West

It’s summertime, and the reading is easy. (For many, that is. There are some who like to take advantage of long beach days with a tome they otherwise wouldn’t have time to read; to them, we say more power to you!) As a bookworm, I’m always looking for a good read to take with me, whether that’s to the beach or otherwise—although I do prefer the beach. And as a proud employment law geek, I love it when my pleasure reading gives a nod to my chosen profession. So if you, too, like your summer reading to dish out a generous portion of human resources (I can’t be the only one, now, can I?), here are some of my personal favorites.

Fiction
Then We Came to the End: A Novel by Joshua FerrisThen We Came to the End was described to me as “Office Space in book form,” and I have to say, that description is apt. The book chronicles a group of employees in a Chicago advertising firm facing deep staffing cuts. It’s narrated in the first-person plural, which is an interesting, little-used perspective, and as a result, it honestly captures the group dynamics of many offices. This dark comedy manages to be simultaneously sad and funny . . . and anyone who has ever looked with an envious eye at a coworker’s office furniture will blush with recognition.

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