Standing ovation for Adam Jones at Fenway

Kristin Starnes Gray

Last Monday, the Orioles made headlines for more than just their 5-2 win over the Red Sox at Fenway Park.  Orioles player Adam Jones reported that Red Sox fans called him a racial slur several times and threw a bag of peanuts at him as he was entering the dugout. Police reportedly ejected 34 people, including the person who threw the bag of peanuts. The Red Sox, Boston Mayor Marty Walsh, and MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred all condemned the fans’ behavior.  Fenway park at sunset

The following day, fans welcomed Jones with a standing ovation at Fenway Park before his first at-bat. Despite recent hostility that has arisen between the two teams after Manny Machado injured Boston’s Dustin Pedroia, Red Sox starter Chris Sale stepped off the mound on Tuesday to allow more time for Jones’ ovation. In addition, Jones thanked two Boston players, Mookie Betts and David Price, for their supportive text messages. African-American players for other teams also have come forward about their experiences with being called racial slurs by fans during games.

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Developing a PIP that will make employees comeback heroes—Tom Brady style

February 07, 2017 - by: Robin Kallor 0 COMMENTS
Robin Kallor

I’m sure you all watched or heard about the Super Bowl on Sunday night: Despite the fact that his team was trailing by 25 points, Patriots quarterback Tom Brady led New England on the greatest comeback in Super Bowl history. Brady’s season began with a four-game suspension for his involvement in the “deflategate” scandal and ended as Super Bowl MVP. It’s a comeback within a comeback. Despite not knowing much about sports, as a New Englander, I would be remiss if I let this opportunity pass without drawing some sort of analogy to HR. Because my law firm is based in Atlanta, I admit, I’m cowering just a little.  Patriots' parade in Boston for winning Super Bowl XLIX

As HR professionals, we are often called upon to assist managers in addressing concerns with employees who appear to be falling behind company expectations. How can we encourage employee “comebacks” and assist supervisors by providing effective tools to help employees to do so?

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Hope Solo: too little, too late?

August 26, 2016 - by: Kristin Starnes Gray 4 COMMENTS
Kristin Starnes Gray

Hope Solo’s derogatory comments about Sweden’s national women’s soccer team have earned her a six-month ban from U.S. Soccer and the termination of her contract. U.S. Soccer president Sunil Gulati released a statement this week saying, “The comments by Hope Solo after the match against Sweden during the 2016 Olympics were unacceptable and do not meet the standard of conduct we require from our national team players.”  However, many are questioning whether Solo’s punishment for calling Swedish players “cowards” is too little and too late.

Despite her World Cup title, two Olympic gold medals, 202 national team appearances, and 102 clean sheets, Solo has long been a loose cannon with her outrageous behavior overshadowing her performance as a player.  As examples:Women soccer team ticker parade read more…

Olympics and the power of positivity and unity

August 15, 2016 - by: David Kim 0 COMMENTS
David Kim

They did it again. The Olympics sucked me in. I am an admitted hard core sports fan when it comes to my professional teams, but like most people I’m not usually watching swimming, beach volleyball, or [fill in the blank with virtually any other summer Olympic sport] in my free time. However, I always get captivated by the Olympics, and this summer’s Olympics in Rio is no different.  Excited group of runners with medals

Watching U.S. swimmers Michael Phelps, Simone Manual, Katie Ledecky, and many more achieve success in historic fashion had me on the edge of my seat. I haven’t screamed words of encouragement at my TV that much since Ramsey Bolton got his comeuppance in Game of Thrones this past season.

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Great expectations? Let’s tip off with reasonable expectations

June 27, 2016 - by: David Kim 0 COMMENTS
David Kim

Expectations are a funny thing. They can be good in that they set forth an objective measure for expected performance, goals, and standards of conduct. On the other hand, they can turn bad if they are unreasonable or prone to differing or subjective interpretations.

Watching the NBA draft last week, I was struck by how these young men (most of whom are still teenagers) are immediately saddled with expectations: expectations from fans, expectations from the team and its front office, expectations from NBA analysts and media members, and countless others. Without even having played a second of professional basketball, Ben Simmons and Brandon Ingram (who went first and second in the draft to PhilaBasketball going through the hoop at a sports arenadelphia and Los Angeles, respectively) have already been anointed the saviors of 76ers and Lakers basketball for the future. My Boston Celtics selected Jaylen Brown with the third overall pick and were almost universally criticized, by fans and pundits alike, for “reaching” for Brown rather than selecting a better talent at that spot or consummating a trade for the pick. And on and on the analysis went with every subsequent player selected.

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U.S. Women’s National Soccer Team alleges gender wage discrimination

April 01, 2016 - by: Kristin Starnes Gray 0 COMMENTS
Kristin Starnes Gray

Five star players of the U.S. Women’s National Soccer Team (Carli Lloyd, Alex Morgan, Megan Rapinoe, Becky Sauerbrunn and Hope Solo) made headlines this week by filing a charge of discrimination with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission alleging gender wage discrimination against the U.S. Soccer Federation.  In their charge, the players allege that they should be paid at least as much as (if not more than) the players for the Men’s National Team.  The players filed the charge amid contentious negotiations over a new collective bargaining agreement, which have already resulted in a separate lawsuit and serious questions about whether the team will be participating in the Summer Olympic Games in Brazil. Soccer Stars

In their charge, the players allege that they are paid as little as 38 percent of what the Men’s National Team Players earn.  More specifically, the charge alleges that top-tier Women’s National Team Players earn $72,000 per year to play a minimum of 20 exhibition games (“Friendlies,” with no additional pay for games beyond the 20unlike the men’s team which is paid for each game played) and that they earn $99,000 if they win all 20 Friendlies.  Meanwhile, the men earn $100,000 if they lose all their Friendlies and can earn up to approximately $260,000 if they win.  As for the World Cup, the women’s team earned a total of $2 million last year for their championship performance in Canada while the men’s team was paid a total $9 million despite their failure to advance past the top 16 in the 2014 World Cup in Brazil.

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Peyton Manning and retirement–Super Bowl lessons on avoiding age claims at work

February 01, 2016 - by: Josh Sudbury 1 COMMENTS
Josh Sudbury

Super Bowl week is here. Everywhere you look (and I mean everywhere) this week, you will be reminded that the “big game” is this Sunday. You’ll be told what kind of chips to munch, the type of pizza to order, the beer, and soft drink to drink, the television or mobile app to watch it on, etc. It’s as if it’s some big media circus instead of a football game! NEWARK, NJ - JANUARY 26, 2014: Denver Broncos' Peyton Manning ar

If you listen closely, though, you might also hear about the two teams playing—the Denver Broncos and the Carolina Panthers. This year’s match-up offers great story lines that even the best WWE writer couldn’t dream up. The one you are most likely to hear about, though, is the battle between the two quarterbacks. The Broncos will field Peyton Manning (whose records and accomplishments should speak for themselves) and the up-and-coming Cam Newton, who led his team to a 15-1 regular season record and only the second Super Bowl appearance in the franchise’s history. The two quarterbacks’ personalities (and styles) couldn’t be more different. Manning’s persona is strictly business, and he frequently out-humbles even himself during interviews. Cam, on the other hand, is a bit flashier, having drawn negative attention throughout the season as a result of his penchant for dancing after scores.

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Age, sex, and sports media

December 21, 2015 - by: Brian Kurtz 0 COMMENTS
Brian Kurtz

Sports reporter Colleen Dominguez is 54 years old and has enjoyed a successful career in sports journalism including a lengthy stint at ESPN. Dominguez recently jumped to Fox Sports 1 and believes her age and gender are the only plausible reasons that FS1 has cut her broadcasting assignments and diminished her career. These are her allegations in a lawsuit filed recently in a California federal court. The complaint tells the story of a veteran, experienced reporter who has paid her dues but is being pushed aside by the men and the new pretty girl on the block. Can a media company make decisions based on the age and gender of its on-air talent?a young woman journalist with a microphone and a cameraman

This is not the first time this has come up in the TV and entertainment industry. In 1993 a Minnesota jury awarded 53-year-old sportscaster Tom Ryther $1.2 million in an age discrimination case. Ryther, a longtime fixture on TV news, was not renewed after his network commissioned a poll that showed he wasn’t having a “positive” effect on viewership. According to Ryther, at the time of his termination, the station manager asked him how it felt to be a failure at age 53.  No doubt that played well with the jury.

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Alcoholism and how USC may have violated ADA by firing Steve Sarkisian

October 19, 2015 - by: David Kim 8 COMMENTS
David Kim

On October 12, 2015, Steve Sarkisian was fired as  head coach of the University of Southern California (USC) football team. While USC contends Sarkisian was fired for “cause,” there is no question that his alcohol-related behavior led to his termination. Whether the termination was or was not properly for “cause” is relevant, in part, because it would likely determine whether USC would have to pay the remaining three years of his five-year contract. Whether the termination was lawful under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), or analogous state law statutes alcoholismprohibiting discrimination on the basis of disability, is another question. And due to the high public profiles of the institution and the individual involved, this may be a question that is never entirely answered.

Back in August, video emerged of a clearly intoxicated Sarkisian at a USC pep rally, slurring during his speech and using profanity. The coach publicly apologized, contending that his behavior was the result of mixing alcohol and certain undisclosed medication. While Sarkisian denied having a drinking problem, he contended he would go to “treatment” to seek help. It appears Sarkisian neither sought help nor ceased his alcohol consumption. Reports last week emerged from sources that the coach “showed up lit to meetings again” and was told to leave the premises on Sunday. That same day, it was announced by USC Athletic Director Pat Haden that Sarkisian was asked and had agreed to take an indefinite leave of absence for his condition. On the next day, he was officially fired.

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The Cardinal Way

September 29, 2015 - by: Matt Gilley 2 COMMENTS
Matt Gilley

I’m a St. Louis Cardinal lifer so, for most Major League baseball fans out there, you probably assume I’m insufferable. (You may be right.) Still, don’t look for me to apologize that we’re in first place, have been for pretty much the entire season, and boast the best record in baseball. The postseason is upon us and, if all goes well tonight against Pittsburgh, we will wrap up another NL Central Division title and head into the postseason looking for yet another World Series championship. Yes, life is good.  Where the Cardinals play

One of the reasons so many fans find us insufferable is our talk of the “Cardinal Way.” Most people draw this link back to Branch Rickey, the pioneering baseball executive who first developed the Cardinals’ farm system before he went on to engineer Jackie Robinson’s entry into the Majors, thereby breaking down baseball’s color barrier.

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