Pick me! Pick me! NFL draft lessons for HR

April 19, 2017 - by: Matt Gilley 0 COMMENTS
Matt Gilley

The NFL draft is fast approaching, and with it comes the multiple prognostications and mock drafts that try to divine which teams will try to link up with the which talent coming out of the college ranks.

Each team will compile exhaustive profiles on which player prospects fit their urgent needs.Isolated Portraits-Businessman Linebacker Stance

read more…

What’s in a name? Bias in the workplace

March 13, 2017 - by: Katie O'Shea 1 COMMENTS
Katie O'Shea

As Shakespeare wrote, “that which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet.” But there is in fact much to a namea name can convey a sense of identity, culture, and family history. Recently, a series of viral tweets illustrated how much something as simple as a name could affect an individual’s employment.  Business woman versus man corporate ladder career concept vector illustration

A man and his female coworker conducted an experiment whereby they switched their e-mail signatures for two weeks. The series of tweets describes the man’s struggle to gain clients’ respect when using his female coworker’s name.

read more…

What we learned: talent placement lessons from UT football and U.S. Ryder Cup team

October 03, 2016 - by: Josh Sudbury 0 COMMENTS
Josh Sudbury

Sports are about players making plays. Coaches and managers can break down film, scheme, and motivate all they want. But, when the game is on the line, execution is all that matters. As the ole ball coach said, “It’s not about the X’s and O’s, it’s about the Jimmy’s and Joe’s.” This truth was on full display this weekend in two, wholly unrelated sports: college football and … golf.  Buisness start

On Saturday, the Georgia Bulldogs hosted the Tennessee Volunteers “between the hedges” in Athens, Georgia, and the last 30 seconds was likely the wildest ending to a sports contest you’ll ever see. If you didn’t see the game, and have been under a rock all weekend, Georgia threw a 50-yard touchdown pass with 10 seconds left to take the lead, only to have Tennessee throw a 50-yard “Hail Mary” with no time on the clock to win the game. The ending defies all attempts at written description. Do yourself a favor and click the link above, and watch all the videos. (Full disclosure: I am a Tennessee fan. A hopeless, oft-heartbroken Tennessee fan.)

read more…

eTeam: Finding the leader to take you from idea to profit

August 10, 2016 - by: Matt Gilley 0 COMMENTS
Matt Gilley

Books are supposed to be my bailiwick here at the blog and after several posts on anything but, I figure it’s time to return to that groove. This week I want to focus on new businesses, or “startups,” if you prefer.  eBoys

If you’re starting a business and have grand plans for future growth, you really need to check out Randall Stross’s eBoys: The First Inside Account of Venture Capitalists at Work. eBoys has a bit of age on it at this pointit was first published in 2000 and came out soon before the dot-com bubble burst early that decade, and so you could criticize it as out-of-date and out of context. I don’t subscribe to that view.

read more…

Ariana Grande’s online antics result in job loss at the White House

July 25, 2016 - by: Marilyn Moran 0 COMMENTS
Marilyn Moran

Newly leaked e-mails reveal that pop sensation Ariana Grande lost a gig performing at the White House based on a video circulated online last year. The surveillance footage taken at a California doughnut shop showed Grande licking a tray of doughnuts and saying, “I hate America.” The footage was later picked up by TMZ and circulated across social media, creating a firestorm of controversy and criticism against the former Nickelodeon star. A White House staffer tasked with vetting Grande for the job responded to her request to perform with a resounding “Nope” upon learning of her extracurricular activities.  Donut with sprinkles isolated

In refusing to allow Grande to perform, the White House joined the ranks of organizations that vet potential hires by checking applicants’ social media content. According to a 2014 survey from CareerBuilder, forty-three percent of employers use social networking sites to research job candidates. Of those, 51 percent reported that they refused to hire a candidate based on content found on social media. Forty-five percent of employers also use search engines such as Google to research potential job candidates.

read more…

Harvey Specter on human resources

July 18, 2016 - by: Robin Kallor 0 COMMENTS
Robin Kallor

It is challenging to make an attempt at wit and entertainment after the news of the brazen act of violence in Nice, France during a Bastille Day celebration last week. My thoughts and prayers are with the people of Nice, France as they deal with this horrific tragedy.    Suits

Season 6 of Suits aired on USA Network on July 13 with Mike Ross in prison, serving his two-year sentence as a consequence of working as an associate for one of Manhattan’s top law firms, despite not being an admitted attorney; having never passed the bar, gone to law school or even college. Strike that…he somehow took and passed the bar, but never went to law school, did not complete college and was obviously not admitted to practice law.

read more…

‘I was not told there would be math’

April 20, 2016 - by: Matt Gilley 0 COMMENTS
Matt Gilley

Saturday Night Live has made invaluable contributions to American humor, but the best may be the show’s political parodies. Chevy Chase was famous for mocking Gerald Ford’s clumsy reputation (undeserved, for sure, considering Ford was a standout athlete). Dana Carvey practically built a career mimicking George H.W. Bush, and Phil Hartman had Bill Clinton down pat.

One of the best lines, however, came from Will Farrell’s George W. Bush. During a mock debate with Al Gore, Farrell brought roars after responding to a question with, “I was not told there would be math.”

read more…

Bloodline: We did a bad thing

December 11, 2015 - by: Kristin Starnes Gray 0 COMMENTS
Kristin Starnes Gray

“We’re not bad people, but we did a bad thing.” This is the tagline for the Netflix original thriller-drama Bloodline. If you haven’t seen it, run to add it to your watch list immediately. The show takes us into the lives of the Rayburn family, owners of a picturesque beachside hotel in the Florida Keys. Despite the gorgeous backdrop, this family is plagued by its dark and violent past. Pay attention to the opening sequence because a storm is certainly coming.  Woman Mugshot

When the oldest son, Danny, returns home after years away, the family reunion is anything but happy. Need proof? We know from the very start that Danny will end up dead by the hands of one (or more) of his siblings, but it will take the rest of the first season to unravel who kills him, how, and why.

read more…

Haunted by work

November 16, 2015 - by: Matt Gilley 0 COMMENTS
Matt Gilley

This blog’s mission is to be witty, entertaining, and informative. That mission is difficult when the headlines are as sobering as what we’ve seen since last Friday in Paris. Before I launch into this week’s EntertainHR installment, I want to extend my sympathies to and express my solidarity with the people of Paris and, in particular, the lawyers and staff of Capstan Avocats, our French affiliate through Ius Laboris. My thoughts and prayers are with you.   Ghosts at the Office

I have a mindless indulgence—ghost-hunting shows. Maybe it goes back to my childhood days in the Ozarks listening to my family tell stories that had come down from across the generations but, whatever it is, I just can’t get enough of these things. I love watching a group of people wrap themselves in electronic gear, stumble through a purportedly haunted house in the dark, and scare themselves senseless. I eat it up when they manage to catch something—a voice, an image—that actually defies explanation. I once got myself so wrapped up and spooked watching one of these shows that I screamed bloody murder when my wife simply walked in the room. (No, not one of my better moments.)

read more…

Per Liar Liar, performing background checks on minors can be major issue

November 02, 2015 - by: Ed Carlstedt 0 COMMENTS
Ed Carlstedt

Because I’m a lawyer and because my friends know I love movies, people frequently ask me to identify my favorite lawyer-related movies. My personal favorites are My Cousin Vinny, A Few Good Men, and Liar Liar. To the extent you agree or have lawyer-related movies you like as well, feel free to weigh in. As luck would have it, this week’s employer blog lesson comes from the well-timed juxtaposition of a client inquiry and what has to be my hundredth viewing of Jim Carrey’s Liar LiarSign on the Line

Specifically, a client in the hospitality industry recently asked whether it had to obtain parental or legal guardian consent to conduct background checks and drug screens on its minor employees. Particularly in the summer months, many restaurants and hotels hire minors. Unfortunately, many employers mistakenly use the same hiring materials regardless whether the employee is a minor or has reached the age of majority. Thus, the employers ask their minor employees to sign the required consent forms. But do these minor employees have the legal capacity to execute these forms?

read more…

 Page 1 of 3  1  2  3 »