Olympics and the power of positivity and unity

August 15, 2016 - by: David Kim 0 COMMENTS
David Kim

They did it again. The Olympics sucked me in. I am an admitted hard core sports fan when it comes to my professional teams, but like most people I’m not usually watching swimming, beach volleyball, or [fill in the blank with virtually any other summer Olympic sport] in my free time. However, I always get captivated by the Olympics, and this summer’s Olympics in Rio is no different.  Excited group of runners with medals

Watching U.S. swimmers Michael Phelps, Simone Manual, Katie Ledecky, and many more achieve success in historic fashion had me on the edge of my seat. I haven’t screamed words of encouragement at my TV that much since Ramsey Bolton got his comeuppance in Game of Thrones this past season.

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Brilliant (but not bedazzled) baristas

August 01, 2016 - by: Josh Sudbury 2 COMMENTS
Josh Sudbury

A ton of us are drinking coffee. I have a paper cup full of “life juice” next to my keyboard as I write this post. Coffee is not the reason I get out bed, but it is certainly a large contributor to me not staying out for the rest of the day. And, consistent with our nation’s founding principles, Americans have the right to choose where to purchase their preferred stimulant.  Male barista making coffee - line design composition

Those who choose Starbucks may have a more colorful experience on their next fuel up thanks to a new dress code announced by the Seattle-based company last week for employees in the U.S. and Canada. (Though our northern neighbors still prefer Tim Horton’s to Starbucks.) The change comes after an online petition seeking changes to the dress code garnered a reported 14,500 signatures.

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Headline news: Policies, procedures essential tools in fight against sexual harassment

July 12, 2016 - by: Ed Carlstedt 0 COMMENTS
Ed Carlstedt

Last week, former Fox News Anchor Gretchen Carlson slapped Fox News Chairman and CEO Roger Ailes with a wrongful termination and sexual harassment lawsuit in New Jersey Superior Court. The lawsuit alleges that Ailes made “sexually charged comments” to Carlson, including comments about her body and requests for what could be considered quid pro quo sex. According to the allegations, Ailes stated that Carlson and he “should have had a sexual relationship a long time ago . . . .”  Sexual harassment in the office

Carlson’s complaint also attributes numerous other sexually charged statements to Ailes, including comments about her legs and posterior and requests that she wear certain clothes to enhance her figure. Carlson claims that, following her rejection of Ailes’ advances, her contract with Fox News was terminated. Ailes claims that Carlson’s allegations are false and that her contract was terminated due to her television show’s poor ratings.

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Great expectations? Let’s tip off with reasonable expectations

June 27, 2016 - by: David Kim 0 COMMENTS
David Kim

Expectations are a funny thing. They can be good in that they set forth an objective measure for expected performance, goals, and standards of conduct. On the other hand, they can turn bad if they are unreasonable or prone to differing or subjective interpretations.

Watching the NBA draft last week, I was struck by how these young men (most of whom are still teenagers) are immediately saddled with expectations: expectations from fans, expectations from the team and its front office, expectations from NBA analysts and media members, and countless others. Without even having played a second of professional basketball, Ben Simmons and Brandon Ingram (who went first and second in the draft to PhilaBasketball going through the hoop at a sports arenadelphia and Los Angeles, respectively) have already been anointed the saviors of 76ers and Lakers basketball for the future. My Boston Celtics selected Jaylen Brown with the third overall pick and were almost universally criticized, by fans and pundits alike, for “reaching” for Brown rather than selecting a better talent at that spot or consummating a trade for the pick. And on and on the analysis went with every subsequent player selected.

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Westeros might have benefited from recent trends in paid family leave

May 03, 2016 - by: David Kim 0 COMMENTS
David Kim

Game of Thrones, one of my favorite shows, most recently returned for its sixth season. Don’t worry, no spoilers here if you haven’t seen the first couple of episodes of this season. However, if you haven’t noticed, one of the recurring themes for characters in Game of Thrones appears to be daddy issues. In fact, in virtually every circumstance, a major character’s flaws, insecurities, or other personality traits can easily be traced to the relationship with one’s parents, specifically the father. Here are some examples:  Parents want to spend time with baby read more…

Exercise Aniston-esque restraint when analyzing offensive employee posts

February 22, 2016 - by: Ed Carlstedt 0 COMMENTS
Ed Carlstedt

by Ed Carlstedt

This week’s employment law lesson comes to us from the movie Horrible Bosses. In the movie, Julia (played by Jennifer Aniston) is a dentist who employs dental assistant Dale (played by Charlie Day). After Julia uses her boss status to torture and torment Dale for most of the movie, Dale finally records her improprieties and delivers to her the following long-overdue payback speech:

This is what’s gonna happen. I’m going to take a two-week-long, very expensive holiday with my fiancée. Let’s call it a honeymoon. And YOU’RE going to pay for it! Then I’m going to return to a nice, rape-free workplace from now on. Because if you so much as LOOK at my sexy little a**, Julia, I will have yours locked the f*** up you CRAZY B**** WH***! Man, that felt GOOD!

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Beyonce: I just might be the next Bill Gates in the making

February 08, 2016 - by: Kristin Starnes Gray 0 COMMENTS
Kristin Starnes Gray

Who wants to be the next Bill Gates in the making? The answer may surprise you. Beyoncé (or “Queen Bey”), a music scene A-lister and the woman who “runs the world” (if you ask her legions of devoted fans, known as the “BeyHive”), gives the world’s richest man a major shout-out in her new single, “Formation.” If you have not seen the video on YouTube or streamed the track on Tidal, Beyoncé gave us all a taste of it in Sunday night’s Super Bowl halftime show with Coldplay and Bruno Mars. In her new single, she sings, “You just might be a black Bill Gates in the making/I just might be a black Bill Gates in the making.” Gates may appreciate the positive press, especially after some recent criticism about his early managerial methods, such as his penchant for profanity and prowling the parking lot on weekends to document who had arrived at work. leadership

Gates, who has seemingly mellowed considerably over the years, has been pretty open about his early methods, disclosing in a recent radio interview for BBC’s “Desert Island Discs” that he did not really believe in vacations and he memorized everyone’s license plates to see when people came into work. However, Gates stated, “I had to be a little careful not to try and apply my standards to how hard [others] worked . . . . Eventually I had to loosen up as the company got to a reasonable size.” Others have come forward over the years with stories about Gates’ allegedly harsh leadership style earlier in his career.

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Age, sex, and sports media

December 21, 2015 - by: Brian Kurtz 0 COMMENTS
Brian Kurtz

Sports reporter Colleen Dominguez is 54 years old and has enjoyed a successful career in sports journalism including a lengthy stint at ESPN. Dominguez recently jumped to Fox Sports 1 and believes her age and gender are the only plausible reasons that FS1 has cut her broadcasting assignments and diminished her career. These are her allegations in a lawsuit filed recently in a California federal court. The complaint tells the story of a veteran, experienced reporter who has paid her dues but is being pushed aside by the men and the new pretty girl on the block. Can a media company make decisions based on the age and gender of its on-air talent?a young woman journalist with a microphone and a cameraman

This is not the first time this has come up in the TV and entertainment industry. In 1993 a Minnesota jury awarded 53-year-old sportscaster Tom Ryther $1.2 million in an age discrimination case. Ryther, a longtime fixture on TV news, was not renewed after his network commissioned a poll that showed he wasn’t having a “positive” effect on viewership. According to Ryther, at the time of his termination, the station manager asked him how it felt to be a failure at age 53.  No doubt that played well with the jury.

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Go Scrooge yourself: 5 biz holiday party tips

December 07, 2015 - by: Ed Carlstedt 0 COMMENTS
Ed Carlstedt

‘Tis the season for your company’s annual holiday party. And while the notion of drinking, eating and generally enjoying merriment with your coworkers, subordinates, and superiors may seem innocuous, it is anything but. What seems like a festive occasion during the most wonderful time of the year is, if sledded incorrectly, a mine field of potential employment law mishaps. And while I don’t mean to be a Scrooge, this week’s lesson comes from a scene in one of my favorite holiday classics, the movie Scrooged with Bill Murray. What can we learn from this seasonal, cinematic favorite? Well, you can learn that, for purposes of the company holiday party, you should consider “Scrooge-ing” yourself. office holiday party

In the movie, Bill Murray’s character, Frank Cross (the modern day Scrooge), is visited by three ghosts, several of whom transport him back in time to certain life events that froze his heart and led to his hatred for Christmas. During one of his time-traveling trips, Frank visits his office during a wild late-1960s holiday party. People are seen drinking heavily, dancing, flirting with coworkers, and dressing inappropriately, and one woman, Tina (who is wearing a rather skimpy Santa’s helper outfit) is even handing out photocopies of her derriere.

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3 tips on firing employees—Les Miles/Mark Richt “silly season” edition

December 01, 2015 - by: Josh Sudbury 0 COMMENTS
Josh Sudbury

With the college football regular season coming to a close, you may have noticed that a different kind of season has begun, a time referred to by authors and sports bloggers alike as “silly season.” The fun (and farce) is typically kicked off by the mid- to late-season rumors that a formerly promising coach of a prominent program will be shown the door as soon as the clock hits zero at the last game. Many times their replacementthe one who will certainly be able to finally take us all the way!is an unproven coordinator from a rival school, an up-and-coming head coach from a lesser conference or division, or even more hilariously, a head coach recently given the boot by another program. Laid off-Head in hand

This year, the biggest rumors surrounded LSU head coach Les Miles, a man with a career winning percentage above 75% at LSU, a national championship, an SEC championship, multiple SEC West division championships, and seven seasons with 10 wins or more. And let’s not forget Les also had a buyout provision in his contract worth a reported $15 million, which allegedly was “not an issue” for the LSU booster club, despite the fact that the university itself is on the verge of bankruptcy. Thankfully, cooler heads prevailed after the Tigers took down Texas A&M in Baton Rouge 19-7.

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