When the floodgates open, expect water at your doorstep

November 13, 2017 - by: David Kim 0 COMMENTS
David Kim

About a month ago, my colleague Kristin Gray wrote about the breaking Harvey Weinstein scandal and best practices for employers to prevent harassment and discrimination from invading the workplace. And while I have no intention of reiterating any of the excellent points Kristin covered in her piece, it would be ignoring the obvious not to say that a lot has transpired since that breaking news story.

Virtually every day since then, additional allegations of sexual harassment and misconduct have been made against prominent public figures. Not just individuals in Hollywood (which include everyone from executives, producers, writers and actors), but also against politicians, publishers and editors from various media organizations, news contributors, restauranteurs, and a slew of others. On top of these serious allegations, numerous individuals (both public figures and “regular” individuals like you and me) have utilized social media to share their own stories or harassment, not only sexually based but also other forms of harassment and bullying within the workplace.

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Halloween at work: Don’t get BOOed by your employees!

October 30, 2017 - by: Angela Cummings 0 COMMENTS
Angela Cummings

Halloween can be such a fun holiday for kids of all ages. When October 31st falls on a weekday, as it does this year, ghoulish fun will certainly creep its way into the workplace. How can you, as a human resources professional, ensure that the day is more fun than it is scary? Simple. Just follow a few rules.Halloween theme 3

1: Make any Halloween office festivities totally voluntary

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Methinks thou doth protest too much! FYI, only ‘reasonable’ opposition is protected

October 24, 2017 - by: Marilyn Moran 0 COMMENTS
Marilyn Moran

It seems that every day the news is full of stories about employees (whether they are NFL players or Hollywood starlets) protesting unfair treatment. Usually, when an employee complains about discrimination, harassment, equal pay, or other work-related topics, he or she is protected from discipline or termination because the conduct is considered “protected activity” under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and a myriad of other federal and state employment laws.  Hand holding protest sign

Under limited circumstances, however, an employee’s protests may cross the line from protected opposition to unprotected disruption. Specifically, an employee who engages in loud, unreasonable, and disruptive protests at work, even though the action is borne out of an attempt to protest alleged unfair treatment or discrimination, isn’t protected by Title VII. Rather, only reasonable opposition and reasonable protests are considered protected activity. read more…

Harvey Weinstein: beauty and the beastly mogul

October 12, 2017 - by: Kristin Starnes Gray 0 COMMENTS
Kristin Starnes Gray

Over the last week, the fallout from a New York Times article regarding Harvey Weinstein has been swift and significant. On October 5, the Times published an explosive story about Hollywood producer and media mogul Weinstein’s alleged sexual harassment spanning decades. More and more women have been coming forward since the story broke to accuse Weinstein of unwelcome sexual advances and sexual assault during his time at Miramax and the Weinstein Company. The Times quoted Weinstein as stating, “I appreciate the way I’ve behaved with colleagues in the past has caused a lot of pain, and I sincerely apologize for it. Though I’m trying to do better, I know that I have a long way to go.”  Stop Sexual Harassment red stop sign held by a female

According to the Times, Weinstein has reached settlements with at least eight women over the years, and his former attorney, Lisa Bloom, has described him as “an old dinosaur learning new ways.” The growing list of allegations stands in stark contrast against Weinstein’s public image as a liberal, humanitarian, and champion of women. The Times quoted Ashley Judd as saying, “Women have been talking about Harvey amongst ourselves for a long time, and it’s simply beyond time to have the conversation publicly.”

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In honor of Labor Day, some time sheet tips to beat FLSA off-the-clock claims

September 05, 2017 - by: Marilyn Moran 0 COMMENTS
Marilyn Moran

Ah, Labor Day. Family barbecues, a trip to the beach, your last chance to wear white, time spent napping and binging on Netflix, or just a simple day of relaxation. However you spent the long weekend, I hope you enjoyed some rest from your labors. As an employment lawyer and a mother, the word “labor” has two rather negative connotations for meas in “labor pains” and, even worse, the “Fair Labor Standards Act.” I will spare you the details of the former and focus instead on the latter in today’s post.  Overtime (2) read more…

HR issues that arise when natural disasters hit

August 29, 2017 - by: Robin Kallor 2 COMMENTS
Robin Kallor

Natural disasters, like Hurricane Harvey, raise a host of issues for employers, regardless of whether these employers have a direct presence in the affected areas or whether they have employees residing in or telecommuting from them. Sometimes employers are forced to close or are able to remain open in some capacity, but employees are not able to travel to work or need to attend to emergent matters during or in the aftermath of these types of events. Some of the more commonly asked questions are addressed below. Notepad with disaster plan on a wooden table.

1. If there is a forced closure of the workplace, must an employer pay its employees their wages during this shutdown period?

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New media rating seeks to bring common sense to gender stereotyping

July 10, 2017 - by: Robin Kallor 0 COMMENTS
Robin Kallor

When my son was five and constantly arguing and negotiating for extra dessert or whatever it was that he wanted at any given time, people would often say, “You should be a lawyer!” His response was always: “I don’t want to be a lawyer because that’s a girl’s job.” While slightly humorous because lawyers are not stereotypically female, I would always respond that there was no such thing as girls’ jobs or boys’ jobs. Because I was a lawyer, he saw the world through that prism. Despite what kids see in real life–that the world is filled with men and women who do not conform to stereotypes in their careers and in division of labor at home–according to studies by Common Sense Media, movies and television have not kept up with the times; and undoubtedly, media play a huge role in how we all view the world–not just how kids do.  Gender Equality

Common Sense Media is a nonprofit organization that runs a website providing parents and teachers with advice on media and technology for kids. It publishes independent ratings and reviews for nearly everything kids want to watch, read, play, and learn. Common Sense Media is based on the premise that images kids see early in life can have a significant long-term effect on their perception of the world. While much attention has historically been focused on the impact of violent movies, video games, and other media, one of the less discussed areas is on-screen depiction of gender.

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Avoid singing the blues: how employers can mitigate wage/hour liability

May 30, 2017 - by: Angela Cummings 0 COMMENTS
Angela Cummings

In the last few years, there have been multiple headlines noting that celebrities are being sued for their (or their businesses’) failure to pay wages in accordance with applicable state and/or federal law. Two such recent lawsuits involved famous singers.

Overtime (2)

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Howard Stern’s day off : the danger of digging for details when employees call in sick

May 23, 2017 - by: Marilyn Moran 0 COMMENTS
Marilyn Moran

Shock Jock Howard Stern took an unexpected day off from his radio show last week which prompted a firestorm of speculation on social media as to the underlying reason for his absence.  Although Stern’s absence was initially attributed to a “personal day,” many fans speculated that Stern’s sick father was the real reason he missed work.  Sickness absence

To quell the speculation, workaholic Stern revealed to listeners that he took a rare day off because he was, in fact, sick and his voice was not strong enough to do his radio show.  Even after Stern’s announcement, however, some fans continued to sense a conspiracy and wanted more details, with one fan questioning, “If [Stern] taking a sick day is no big deal, why keep it a secret?”

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Standing ovation for Adam Jones at Fenway

Kristin Starnes Gray

Last Monday, the Orioles made headlines for more than just their 5-2 win over the Red Sox at Fenway Park.  Orioles player Adam Jones reported that Red Sox fans called him a racial slur several times and threw a bag of peanuts at him as he was entering the dugout. Police reportedly ejected 34 people, including the person who threw the bag of peanuts. The Red Sox, Boston Mayor Marty Walsh, and MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred all condemned the fans’ behavior.  Fenway park at sunset

The following day, fans welcomed Jones with a standing ovation at Fenway Park before his first at-bat. Despite recent hostility that has arisen between the two teams after Manny Machado injured Boston’s Dustin Pedroia, Red Sox starter Chris Sale stepped off the mound on Tuesday to allow more time for Jones’ ovation. In addition, Jones thanked two Boston players, Mookie Betts and David Price, for their supportive text messages. African-American players for other teams also have come forward about their experiences with being called racial slurs by fans during games.

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