Workplace romances: Do they ‘Suit’ your company?

November 07, 2017 - by: Angela Cummings 0 COMMENTS
Angela Cummings

Like almost everyone I know, I love the ability to binge-watch television series these days. In fact, it is a rare occurrence that I ever watch any show at the time it actually airs. (This Is Us is a notable exception for me.) Instead, I enjoy delving into these characters’ lives several hours at a time. One such show that I am currently gorging on is Suits, which is in its 7th season and airs on the USA NetwBusinesswoman Receiving Red Rosesork. A fellow attorney recommended this show to me, but I was reluctant at first, as I often shy away from legal programsI have practiced law for almost 20 years and television should be an escape for me, right?!

For those who have yet to watch Suits, the premise is as follows: Harvey Specter is a Harvard-educated attorney at a top Manhattan corporate law firm where every case is high-stakes. He hires a brilliant associate, Mike Ross, who had falsified his background to state that he has graduated from Harvard Law School. The truth is, Mike never even graduated from college, much less law school. However, Mike possesses such a talented legal mind that Harvey keeps him on at the firm anyway. (This “falsification of workplace documents” issue involving Mike could certainly be a topic of a future blog….) While working at the firm, Mike falls for a co-worker, Rachel Zane, who is a paralegal. In her role as a paralegal, Rachel “reports” to Mike on many of the cases they handle. Mike and Rachel begin a relationship, secretly at first. Then, other co-workers at various levels learn about the relationship. While this all makes for great television, workplace romances can create headaches when they pop up in our real workplaces.

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Providing grief relief in age of mass shootings

October 04, 2017 - by: Rachel E. Kelly 0 COMMENTS
Rachel E. Kelly

Las Vegas City SunsetThe headlines rang out early Monday morning as many of us were preparing to leave home for work: DEADLIEST MASS SHOOTING IN US HISTORY. Coffee. IT WAS MADNESS. Toasted bagel. 50+ KILLED, MORE THAN 500 INJURED. Orange Juice. THERE WAS BLOOD EVERYWHERE.

Sunday night at the highlight concert of the Route 91 Harvest Festival, 64-year-old Steven Paddock smashed out two windows in his 32nd floor suite at the Mandalay Bay Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas and rained down terror on the 20,000+ unassuming concertgoers at the festival below. To date, the death toll has risen to 59, with more than 527 injured victims.

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Fox News & Bill O’Reilly—best practices for conducting internal workplace investigations

May 01, 2017 - by: Rachel E. Kelly 0 COMMENTS
Rachel E. Kelly

Bill O’Reilly’s reign as a Fox News favorite came to an abrupt end amid a series of sexual harassment allegations against him. After the most recent allegations, Fox News hired large law firm Paul Weiss to conduct its internal investigation.    Employment Incident  Investigation Form

Workplace investigations are tough, and if your organization can’t afford (or simply does not want) to hire a legal giant to handle the internal investigation, there are some key steps to ensure the investigation is fair, impartial, and efficient.

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Hack attacks!

January 11, 2017 - by: Matt Gilley 0 COMMENTS
Matt Gilley

Lately, the news has led with stories about the alleged Russian hacking of various American political organizations, ostensibly for the purpose of influencing the 2016 elections. U.S. law enforcement has surmised that the Russian government orchestrated a number of incursions into networks controlled by the major political parties and that they used or disclosed certain information. You’ll recall the leaks of major Democrat Party and Hillary Clinton campaign e-mails. Now, news reports claim that the investigation revealed the Russian government may have collected compromising information about President-elect Donald Trump.Data-Breach

As with any hacking story, we can’t be sure exactly what’s out there or what’s real. However, we can’t deny that hacking goes on beyond government and politics. Private organizations and businesses are just as enticing to data thieves, and are often softer targets. We have seen prominent data thefts from all industries:  Telecommunications, manufacturing, tech, and consulting are all targets.

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#Fired: Post a tweet, lose your job

August 23, 2016 - by: Katie O'Shea 0 COMMENTS
Katie O'Shea

Many people enjoy spouting off what they view as 140-character tidbits of wisdom on the social media platform Twitter. But recently several individuals have found themselves in trouble with their employers (read: former employers) for their tweets or other social media posts.  Tweet

One recent example was a loan officer from Michigan who crafted a racist tweet, not worth repeating here, following First Lady Michelle Obama’s speech at the Democratic National Convention. Twitter users saw the tweet and tracked down the home loan company the woman worked for. The result was a flood of tweets directed to the company’s Twitter profile calling their attention to the tweet and asking if the employee’s views represented the company’s values.

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Andrews and Hogan verdicts demonstrate disgust against invasion of privacy

March 21, 2016 - by: David Kim 0 COMMENTS
David Kim

Just this month, two large jury awards were given to celebrities in their respective civil suits alleging amongst other things, invasion of privacy:

  • First, FOX sportscaster Erin Andrews was awarded $55 million in her lawsuit against a Nashville hotel and stalker after she was secretly videotaped in her hotel room in 2008. The jury found that the hotel chain was 49 percent at fault and held them liable for approximately $27 million.Man Watching through window blinds
  • Then last week, Terry Bollea, known publicly as Hulk Hogan, was awarded $115 million in damages in his invasion of privacy case against Gawker.com over its publication of a sex tape involving Hogan. The Florida jury’s award consisted of $55 million for economic harm and $60 million for emotional distress and doesn’t even include punitive damages, which will have to be established separately.

Although the respective defendants in these two cases still have the opportunity to appeal, the fact remains that these huge awards demonstrate the juries’–and likely the overall public’s–disgust with invasion of privacy. Of course, the salacious nature of these videos, which involve the most intrusive and intimate aspects of an individual’s life, surely contributed to the results. That being said, everyone, including employers, should note the importance individuals place on their own privacy and ensure that one does not unjustly intrude on someone else’s sacred private space.

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Employment is short. Don’t have an affair.

September 08, 2015 - by: Brian Kurtz 2 COMMENTS
Brian Kurtz

Imagine a guy, a married guy, more specifically an unhappily married guy, and even more specifically an unhappily married guy lacking a moral compass. The guy creates a discrete (ha!) profile on AshleyMadison.com, a dating website for married people whose tagline is “Life is Short. Have an Affair.” No need to prowl hotel bars at last call. Thanks to Ashley Madison, our guy can arrange an illicit rendezvous from the privacy of his laptop. shhhhh

Or not.

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Workaholics: Drug testing

April 06, 2015 - by: Kristin Starnes Gray 4 COMMENTS
Kristin Starnes Gray

The Comedy Central show Workaholics is currently in its fifth season of depicting a fresh (and hilarious) human resources nightmare week after week. The show is about three recent college dropouts (Blake, Adam, and Anders) who also happen to be roommates and coworkers at a fictional telemarketing company, TelAmeriCorp. To give you an idea of just how mischievous these three can be, their drug dealer/turtle feeder is also a regular fixture on the show. iStock_000003274349_Large

Fittingly, the pilot episode deals with the trio attempting to pass a company-wide drug test after a day of partying. Their shenanigans include, for example, bribing a middle school boy with fireworks and ninja stars in exchange for clean urine. When this plan goes awry (I won’t give away the messy details), the group decides to accept their  fate and take the drug test. Blake, however, finds inspiration from the film Die Hard and decides to contaminate ALL the employees’ samples before escaping just in the nick of time. Shocked to find that all TelAmeriCorp employees failed the drug test, Alice Murphy (senior sales associate and boss to our oddly endearing–though often disgusting and misguided–trio) relieves the drug tester of his duties. Blake, Adam, and Anders celebrate only to learn that the company has planned a hair follicle test.

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Breaking Bad: Disciplining employees for off-duty conduct

October 06, 2014 - by: Marilyn Moran 1 COMMENTS
Marilyn Moran

You can hardly get through your morning coffee these days without seeing another story about some athlete, model, or actor who abused his wife, trashed her Beverly Hills hotel room, or went all shutterstock_180348752Archie Bunker in a racist Twitter rampage. Usually, high-profile celebrities are bound by employment contracts that require strict adherence to an impeccable standard of personal conduct. But what can the average employer do if Walter White, the usually quiet and docile chemist with a spotless work history, decides to break bad over the weekend, uses his RV for a meth lab, and has his mug shot splashed all over the news? Like so many legal questions, the answer is “it depends.”

Generally, under the at-will doctrine, employees can be fired for any reason, or no reason at all, as long as the reason is not illegal. Unfortunately, deciphering whether a reason is “legal” or “illegal”  is not as clear as Walter’s blue crystal. Obviously, it is illegal to discipline or terminate an employee based on the employee’s race, religion, or sex, but most off-duty conduct lies somewhere in the gray area. Until recently, most employers did not give a second thought before disciplining an employee for off-duty criminal conduct, but the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) has loudly condemned the practice. According to the EEOC, some racial minorities are disproportionately more likely to be arrested or convicted of criminal offenses than others, so the agency is critical of employment policies that universally disadvantage applicants or employees based on past criminal conduct.  As a result, the safest bet for disciplining employees for off-duty conduct is to focus on the job-related consequences of the behavior, rather than the behavior itself.

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Learning from tragedy–depression and mental health in the workplace

August 17, 2014 - by: Josh Sudbury 2 COMMENTS
Josh Sudbury

This past week, the entertainment world lost one of its best and brightest to an apparent suicide. Robin Williams, who brought laughter to so many for so long, took his own life at the age of 63. So much has been written about his talent over the past week that it’s difficult to understand or accept how such a thing could have happeneshutterstock_198363611d. But, Robin Williams’ tragic death is a reminder to all of us of the very real and very serious presence of anxiety and depression in our daily lives regardless of whether we ourselves or a close friend or family member suffers from these afflictions.

Just as much as depression can affect our home and family lives, it also has a serious impact at work. In 1995, the National Institute of Mental Health estimated that as many as 1 in 20 employees was suffering from depression. So, count how many employees work for your company and do the math. If you are a company of any size, it’s likely that at least one or more of your employees may be dealing with his or her own depression or that of a family member.

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