Our Brand is Crisis … prevention and management

March 06, 2017 - by: David Kim 0 COMMENTS
David Kim

Alleged communications with Russian officials, an Attorney General recusal, and claims of impermissible wiretapping. Guess you could say it’s been an active past few days in the world of U.S. politics. Heck, it’s been a flurry of activity for a while now, and more is certainly to come, starting with the revised executive order regarding immigration that was announced today. Crisis Averted

Interestingly, and perhaps appropriately, I happened to watch a movie called Our Brand is Crisis two days ago while flying home from a business trip. The 2015 movie, which is based on a 2005 documentary of the same name, is a fictionalized account of the involvement of American political campaign strategists during the 2002 Bolivian presidential election. As a form of entertainment, the movie has its flaws but does have a great performance by Sandra Bullock (and though I have heard the documentary is much better, I haven’t personally seen it yet). I won’t get into much in the way of specifics except to say that in the movie, Bullock’s campaign manager and her team decide that their “brand is crisis”namely, that their strategy is to declare and sell crisis (economic, cultural, and social) by whatever means necessary to promote their candidate.

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HR tips for drafting and cultivating your own ‘Tom Brady’ or ‘Aaron Rodgers’

January 16, 2017 - by: David Kim 0 COMMENTS
David Kim

Think the NFL was happy with this past Sunday’s games? I sure do. The NFL playoffs are in full swing and that usually is great news for the league since they get to dominate the sports headlines for a while. But after a weekend and a half of lackluster matchups and boring blowouts, the NFL must be counting its lucky stars that it finally got two competitive games in the divisional round playoffs this past Sunday, with the back-and-forth matchup between the Packers and Cowboys serving as an instant classic.  Chief help an employee to hit the ball

After the dust has settled, four teams now remain. And there’s a similar thread running through each of these four remaining teams: outstanding quarterbacks. Matt Ryan may not have had previous playoff success, but he’s had a phenomenal year that will likely garner him the MVP award. Aaron Rodgers has been the hottest quarterback down the stretch and is annually one of the leaders at his position. Big Ben Roethlisberger is also a yearly constant and always a threat to make an impact in any game. Tom Brady is, well, Tom Brady.

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Be prepared even if taking the wait-and-see approach

November 21, 2016 - by: David Kim 0 COMMENTS
David Kim

My son is addicted to movie trailers. Don’t get me wrong, I love movie trailers myself, but my son takes it to another level. I recently checked the YouTube history on the iPad we permit our kids to use and found that instead of playing games on the multitude of kid-friendly applications we downloaded, my son has been digesting trailers for upcoming movies via YouTube on a fairly regular basis. The funny thing is, it hasn’t been my five year old son, but rather my three year old who has taken to this habit, allowing me to come to four conclusions.  Coming soon in cinema hall

First, my three year old somehow knows how to navigate YouTube even better than I do. Second, now I know why my son keeps beating his chest like a gorilla and then roaring (Thank you trailer for Kong: Skull Island), as well as why he keeps asking me “Where are the beasts?” (Thank you trailer for Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them). Three, I guess I need to spend Thanksgiving weekend putting some parental restrictions on the Ipad and/or YouTube before this gets really out of hand. And four, there are a lot of movies coming out soon, which makes sense because it is the holiday season.

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From sports and entertainment to politics and social justice—when worlds collide in your workplace

September 19, 2016 - by: David Kim 0 COMMENTS
David Kim

It’s everywhere. Whether you like it or not, you can’t escape it. While the topics of politics and social justice are undoubtedly important discussions to have in our country, the reality is that they now seem ever present. Consider, for example, two popular entertainment outlets many individuals usually go to in order to “escape” from their daily routines: sports and television.  protesting with different opinions

Within the sports realm, and with apologies to the other sports, there is no question that the return of the NFL season garnered the most anticipation the last couple weeks. Yet the biggest story wasn’t necessarily the play on the field. Instead, it was San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick’s decision to kneel for the national anthem as a demonstration of protest against racial inequality and oppression in this country. A number of other NFL players subsequently joined in the protest in their own way, as did athletes from other sports, most notably in the news was U.S. soccer star Megan Rapinoe.

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Olympics and the power of positivity and unity

August 15, 2016 - by: David Kim 0 COMMENTS
David Kim

They did it again. The Olympics sucked me in. I am an admitted hard core sports fan when it comes to my professional teams, but like most people I’m not usually watching swimming, beach volleyball, or [fill in the blank with virtually any other summer Olympic sport] in my free time. However, I always get captivated by the Olympics, and this summer’s Olympics in Rio is no different.  Excited group of runners with medals

Watching U.S. swimmers Michael Phelps, Simone Manual, Katie Ledecky, and many more achieve success in historic fashion had me on the edge of my seat. I haven’t screamed words of encouragement at my TV that much since Ramsey Bolton got his comeuppance in Game of Thrones this past season.

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Great expectations? Let’s tip off with reasonable expectations

June 27, 2016 - by: David Kim 0 COMMENTS
David Kim

Expectations are a funny thing. They can be good in that they set forth an objective measure for expected performance, goals, and standards of conduct. On the other hand, they can turn bad if they are unreasonable or prone to differing or subjective interpretations.

Watching the NBA draft last week, I was struck by how these young men (most of whom are still teenagers) are immediately saddled with expectations: expectations from fans, expectations from the team and its front office, expectations from NBA analysts and media members, and countless others. Without even having played a second of professional basketball, Ben Simmons and Brandon Ingram (who went first and second in the draft to PhilaBasketball going through the hoop at a sports arenadelphia and Los Angeles, respectively) have already been anointed the saviors of 76ers and Lakers basketball for the future. My Boston Celtics selected Jaylen Brown with the third overall pick and were almost universally criticized, by fans and pundits alike, for “reaching” for Brown rather than selecting a better talent at that spot or consummating a trade for the pick. And on and on the analysis went with every subsequent player selected.

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Westeros might have benefited from recent trends in paid family leave

May 03, 2016 - by: David Kim 0 COMMENTS
David Kim

Game of Thrones, one of my favorite shows, most recently returned for its sixth season. Don’t worry, no spoilers here if you haven’t seen the first couple of episodes of this season. However, if you haven’t noticed, one of the recurring themes for characters in Game of Thrones appears to be daddy issues. In fact, in virtually every circumstance, a major character’s flaws, insecurities, or other personality traits can easily be traced to the relationship with one’s parents, specifically the father. Here are some examples:  Parents want to spend time with baby read more…

Andrews and Hogan verdicts demonstrate disgust against invasion of privacy

March 21, 2016 - by: David Kim 0 COMMENTS
David Kim

Just this month, two large jury awards were given to celebrities in their respective civil suits alleging amongst other things, invasion of privacy:

  • First, FOX sportscaster Erin Andrews was awarded $55 million in her lawsuit against a Nashville hotel and stalker after she was secretly videotaped in her hotel room in 2008. The jury found that the hotel chain was 49 percent at fault and held them liable for approximately $27 million.Man Watching through window blinds
  • Then last week, Terry Bollea, known publicly as Hulk Hogan, was awarded $115 million in damages in his invasion of privacy case against Gawker.com over its publication of a sex tape involving Hogan. The Florida jury’s award consisted of $55 million for economic harm and $60 million for emotional distress and doesn’t even include punitive damages, which will have to be established separately.

Although the respective defendants in these two cases still have the opportunity to appeal, the fact remains that these huge awards demonstrate the juries’–and likely the overall public’s–disgust with invasion of privacy. Of course, the salacious nature of these videos, which involve the most intrusive and intimate aspects of an individual’s life, surely contributed to the results. That being said, everyone, including employers, should note the importance individuals place on their own privacy and ensure that one does not unjustly intrude on someone else’s sacred private space.

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What #OscarsSoWhite teaches us about disparate impact

January 25, 2016 - by: David Kim 0 COMMENTS
David Kim

I have to admit that I’m just not a big fan of awards shows, and that includes the Academy Awards. Don’t get me wrong, I love movies. But I find awards shows dull and way, way too long. If something extremely funny happens, or someone makes an incredibly touching or socially impactful speech, I can frankly watch it the next morning on the Internet.  OscarSoWhite

Yet, despite my lack of interest in awards shows, it’s hard to ignore the controversy surrounding the most recent Academy Award nominations announced a couple weeks ago. For the second year in a row, all 20 contenders in the acting categories are Caucasian. Last year, this resulted in the trending hashtag #OscarsSoWhite, which not surprisingly has been resurrected again this year. There was of course immediate backlash to the nominations. Numerous individualsboth white and of colordecried the lack of diversity in not only the nominations, but in the industry itself. Certain celebrities made public their intention to boycott the awards. It has become somewhat of a social media frenzy as everyone has chimed in with their opinion.

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Alcoholism and how USC may have violated ADA by firing Steve Sarkisian

October 19, 2015 - by: David Kim 8 COMMENTS
David Kim

On October 12, 2015, Steve Sarkisian was fired as  head coach of the University of Southern California (USC) football team. While USC contends Sarkisian was fired for “cause,” there is no question that his alcohol-related behavior led to his termination. Whether the termination was or was not properly for “cause” is relevant, in part, because it would likely determine whether USC would have to pay the remaining three years of his five-year contract. Whether the termination was lawful under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), or analogous state law statutes alcoholismprohibiting discrimination on the basis of disability, is another question. And due to the high public profiles of the institution and the individual involved, this may be a question that is never entirely answered.

Back in August, video emerged of a clearly intoxicated Sarkisian at a USC pep rally, slurring during his speech and using profanity. The coach publicly apologized, contending that his behavior was the result of mixing alcohol and certain undisclosed medication. While Sarkisian denied having a drinking problem, he contended he would go to “treatment” to seek help. It appears Sarkisian neither sought help nor ceased his alcohol consumption. Reports last week emerged from sources that the coach “showed up lit to meetings again” and was told to leave the premises on Sunday. That same day, it was announced by USC Athletic Director Pat Haden that Sarkisian was asked and had agreed to take an indefinite leave of absence for his condition. On the next day, he was officially fired.

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