“Silicon Valley”: Start me up

September 17, 2015 - by: Matt Gilley 0 COMMENTS
Matt Gilley

Mike Judge has done it again. A few months ago, I wrote about one of my favorite workplace flicks, Office Space, and the dangers of pushing off uncomfortable employment issues (specifically Milt Waddams, a mumbly arsonist-to-be). Now I’m hooked on Mike Judge’s latest project, HBO’s Silicon ValleySilicon Valley

Silicon Valley chronicles the ups and downs of life in a tech startup.  The feature characters are all residents of an eccentric business incubator that allows them free room and board in exchange for 10 percent of their companies and some questionable business direction. One of the characters (Richard) suddenly scores the attention of several venture capitalists and potential acquirers for his company, Pied Piper, and its revolutionary compression algorithm. From that point, the show does a brilliant job of showing that initially successful tech startups are a bit like the dog who chased the carand caught it.

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Ranking the high court

December 01, 2014 - by: Matt Gilley 0 COMMENTS
Matt Gilley

When football season kicked off earlier this year, I took the chance to glean some insights for HR professionals from the difficult job facing the new college football playoff selection committee. Now that we’re coming up on the end of the football season, I’m turning to the committee once more for inspiration.shutterstock_105026918

As I write, the selection committee is chewing over this weekend’s results and will let us know its judgment on the four best teams (so far) in college football. Soon, they will choose the “final four” who will play a two-week tournament to decide the national champion. Right now, Alabama and Oregon are pretty much the consensus #1 and #2. Despite Florida State’s best efforts to play their way out of this thing, they keep finding ways to win and are generally #3 by default. Mississippi State (last week’s #4) took it on the chin from their archrival, Ole Miss, so the committee will apply its eye test and pick a new #4 (and leave an angry #5 and #6). My money is on TCU at #4.

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Say it ain’t so, A-Rod?

January 20, 2014 - by: David Kim 0 COMMENTS
David Kim

Back in August 2013, I wrote about the Biogenesis scandal that resulted in the suspension of 13 major and minor league baseball players, including a 211-game suspension for Alex Rodriguez. Well, thanks to A-Rod, this story has become the gift that keeps on giving.gummy bears

On January 11, 2014, Arbitrator Frederic R. Horowitz issued his decision with respect to A-Rod’s grievance challenging his suspension. While the Arbitrator reduced A-Rod’s suspension to 162 games, plus the postseason (the entirety of the 2014 season), the decision largely cuts against A-Rod and is viewed as a big win for MLB. While the decision itself would have remained confidential under the terms of the collective bargaining agreement between MLB and the MLB Players Association, it is now a matter of public record as a result of A-Rod’s latest Hail Mary, a federal lawsuit seeking to throw out the arbitrator’s award.

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Biogenesis and the (Bad) Boys of Summer

August 16, 2013 - by: David Kim 0 COMMENTS
David Kim

For some people, summer evokes thoughts of sunshine and long walks on the beach with sand under their bare feet (sounds like the setting of a Nicholas Sparks novel … or so I’m told). For me, I think of baseball. As an annual subscriber to MLB Extra Innings, I think of the plethora of games waiting for me when I get home from work, especially those of my hometown Red Sox. I constantly check my fantasy baseball team to see what moves I can make to catapult me up the standings. When I’m working late, the text from my wife doesn’t just ask when I’m coming home, but also provides me with spirit-lifting updates: “McCutchen just hit a three-run bomb.” Pause. Fist pump. Back to work.

But this summer, my fellow baseball fans and I aren’t the only ones thinking and talking about America’s pastime. Biogenesis has dominated the headlines, culminating in the suspension of 13 major and minor league baseball players this month, in addition to last month’s suspension of Ryan Braun. Interestingly, none of these players actually tested positive for performance enhancing drugs (except for Braun back in 2011, who successfully appealed based on a technicality, and has now been introduced to my friend karma). A failed test would establish per se grounds for a 50-game suspension pursuant to the Joint Drug Agreement (JDA) between Major League Baseball and the Player’s Union.

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