Beyonce: I just might be the next Bill Gates in the making

February 08, 2016 - by: Kristin Starnes Gray 0 COMMENTS
Kristin Starnes Gray

Who wants to be the next Bill Gates in the making? The answer may surprise you. Beyoncé (or “Queen Bey”), a music scene A-lister and the woman who “runs the world” (if you ask her legions of devoted fans, known as the “BeyHive”), gives the world’s richest man a major shout-out in her new single, “Formation.” If you have not seen the video on YouTube or streamed the track on Tidal, Beyoncé gave us all a taste of it in Sunday night’s Super Bowl halftime show with Coldplay and Bruno Mars. In her new single, she sings, “You just might be a black Bill Gates in the making/I just might be a black Bill Gates in the making.” Gates may appreciate the positive press, especially after some recent criticism about his early managerial methods, such as his penchant for profanity and prowling the parking lot on weekends to document who had arrived at work. leadership

Gates, who has seemingly mellowed considerably over the years, has been pretty open about his early methods, disclosing in a recent radio interview for BBC’s “Desert Island Discs” that he did not really believe in vacations and he memorized everyone’s license plates to see when people came into work. However, Gates stated, “I had to be a little careful not to try and apply my standards to how hard [others] worked . . . . Eventually I had to loosen up as the company got to a reasonable size.” Others have come forward over the years with stories about Gates’ allegedly harsh leadership style earlier in his career.

read more…

Peyton Manning and retirement–Super Bowl lessons on avoiding age claims at work

February 01, 2016 - by: Josh Sudbury 1 COMMENTS
Josh Sudbury

Super Bowl week is here. Everywhere you look (and I mean everywhere) this week, you will be reminded that the “big game” is this Sunday. You’ll be told what kind of chips to munch, the type of pizza to order, the beer, and soft drink to drink, the television or mobile app to watch it on, etc. It’s as if it’s some big media circus instead of a football game! NEWARK, NJ - JANUARY 26, 2014: Denver Broncos' Peyton Manning ar

If you listen closely, though, you might also hear about the two teams playingthe Denver Broncos and the Carolina Panthers. This year’s match-up offers great story lines that even the best WWE writer couldn’t dream up. The one you are most likely to hear about, though, is the battle between the two quarterbacks. The Broncos will field Peyton Manning (whose records and accomplishments should speak for themselves) and the up-and-coming Cam Newton, who led his team to a 15-1 regular season record and only the second Super Bowl appearance in the franchise’s history. The two quarterbacks’ personalities (and styles) couldn’t be more different. Manning’s persona is strictly business, and he frequently out-humbles even himself during interviews. Cam, on the other hand, is a bit flashier, having drawn negative attention throughout the season as a result of his penchant for dancing after scores.

read more…

What #OscarsSoWhite teaches us about disparate impact

January 25, 2016 - by: David Kim 0 COMMENTS
David Kim

I have to admit that I’m just not a big fan of awards shows, and that includes the Academy Awards. Don’t get me wrong, I love movies. But I find awards shows dull and way, way too long. If something extremely funny happens, or someone makes an incredibly touching or socially impactful speech, I can frankly watch it the next morning on the Internet.  OscarSoWhite

Yet, despite my lack of interest in awards shows, it’s hard to ignore the controversy surrounding the most recent Academy Award nominations announced a couple weeks ago. For the second year in a row, all 20 contenders in the acting categories are Caucasian. Last year, this resulted in the trending hashtag #OscarsSoWhite, which not surprisingly has been resurrected again this year. There was of course immediate backlash to the nominations. Numerous individualsboth white and of colordecried the lack of diversity in not only the nominations, but in the industry itself. Certain celebrities made public their intention to boycott the awards. It has become somewhat of a social media frenzy as everyone has chimed in with their opinion.

read more…

Keeping it real: litigation insights from ‘Making a Murderer’

January 20, 2016 - by: Matt Gilley 0 COMMENTS
Matt Gilley

It’s mid-January, and I’m sitting in my office writing this post while snow falls outside. (Yes, we get snow in South Carolina and, yes, it terrifies us.) The snow, however, reminds me of the frozen northern Wisconsin landscapes featured in my latest binge-watching favorite, Netflix’s Making a MurdererA peek inside the courtroom

If you’ve not seen it yet, Making a Murderer is a fascinating serial documentary about the murder trial of Steve Avery. Mr. Avery swears by his innocence and defends the murder charge by claiming that the local sheriff’s office framed him. DNA evidence had exonerated Avery of a prior rape conviction (or at least raised sufficient doubt to require his release from prison). He sued the county for his earlier conviction, and soon after key depositions were taken in his lawsuit, a young woman went missing. Key evidence was found near Avery’s home (including charred remains of the missing woman), and he was arrested. He claimed someone set him up and that the police overlooked evidence of his innocence.

read more…

The Intern: delightful movie—risky employment practice

January 12, 2016 - by: Marilyn Moran 0 COMMENTS
Marilyn Moran

Well, the Golden Globes were Sunday night and all of Hollywood tuned it to celebrate the best of film and television. One movie that was noticeably absent from the nominations (at least in my opinion) was The Intern, a heartwarming film starring Robert DeNiro and Anne Hathaway, that tells the story of a lovable retiree who interns at an e-commerce fashion company when its CEO agrees to participate in a community outreach program that places senior citizens in internships. Although the movie highlights the benefit of internships (both for the intern and the company), in recent years the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) has taken a dim view of companies that use unpaid interns to augment their workforce.  Internship

Approximately half a million Americans hold unpaid internships every year, with about 40 percent of those working in the private sector for for-profit companies. Under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), the DOL (and courts) consider six criteria for determining whether an internship can be unpaid: read more…

3 tips for appropriate performance appraisals

January 05, 2016 - by: Josh Sudbury 0 COMMENTS
Josh Sudbury

Each new year brings new resolutions. You might not be surprised to learn a 2015 Nielsen survey showed getting in shape was the most common new year’s resolution for last year. This year is likely to bring more of the same. I know in my own household, Santa brought my wife and me matching Fitbits for Christmas. (St. Nick thought we’d prefer the Charge HR model over the original step counters or the souped-up Surge.) Apparently, we weren’t the only ones getting into the Fitbit craze this holiday season. performance rating and appraisal form

I am happy to report my first foray into “wearable” tech has been pretty successful. I now have documented proof of my sedentary, slothful lifestyle instead of just a strong assumption. The Fitbit gives me feedback on all sorts of things related to my personal fitness. In addition to counting my daily steps, the device allows me to measure walks/runs, monitor my heart rate, track sleep, and estimate calories burned and the number of floors I have climbed. With the app, I can also track my calorie intake (although that requires both effort and a complete lack of shame) and both set and manage fitness goals such as exercise, weight loss, and sleep. Maybe—just maybe—the Fitbit will guilt me into changing that in the new year.

read more…

Age, sex, and sports media

December 21, 2015 - by: Brian Kurtz 0 COMMENTS
Brian Kurtz

Sports reporter Colleen Dominguez is 54 years old and has enjoyed a successful career in sports journalism including a lengthy stint at ESPN. Dominguez recently jumped to Fox Sports 1 and believes her age and gender are the only plausible reasons that FS1 has cut her broadcasting assignments and diminished her career. These are her allegations in a lawsuit filed recently in a California federal court. The complaint tells the story of a veteran, experienced reporter who has paid her dues but is being pushed aside by the men and the new pretty girl on the block. Can a media company make decisions based on the age and gender of its on-air talent?a young woman journalist with a microphone and a cameraman

This is not the first time this has come up in the TV and entertainment industry. In 1993 a Minnesota jury awarded 53-year-old sportscaster Tom Ryther $1.2 million in an age discrimination case. Ryther, a longtime fixture on TV news, was not renewed after his network commissioned a poll that showed he wasn’t having a “positive” effect on viewership. According to Ryther, at the time of his termination, the station manager asked him how it felt to be a failure at age 53.  No doubt that played well with the jury.

read more…

Bloodline: We did a bad thing

December 11, 2015 - by: Kristin Starnes Gray 0 COMMENTS
Kristin Starnes Gray

“We’re not bad people, but we did a bad thing.” This is the tagline for the Netflix original thriller-drama Bloodline. If you haven’t seen it, run to add it to your watch list immediately. The show takes us into the lives of the Rayburn family, owners of a picturesque beachside hotel in the Florida Keys. Despite the gorgeous backdrop, this family is plagued by its dark and violent past. Pay attention to the opening sequence because a storm is certainly coming.  Woman Mugshot

When the oldest son, Danny, returns home after years away, the family reunion is anything but happy. Need proof? We know from the very start that Danny will end up dead by the hands of one (or more) of his siblings, but it will take the rest of the first season to unravel who kills him, how, and why.

read more…

Go Scrooge yourself: 5 company holiday party tips

December 07, 2015 - by: Ed Carlstedt 0 COMMENTS
Ed Carlstedt

‘Tis the season for your company’s annual holiday party. And while the notion of drinking, eating and generally enjoying merriment with your coworkers, subordinates, and superiors may seem innocuous, it is anything but. What seems like a festive occasion during the most wonderful time of the year is, if sledded incorrectly, a mine field of potential employment law mishaps. And while I don’t mean to be a Scrooge, this week’s lesson comes from a scene in one of my favorite holiday classics, the movie Scrooged with Bill Murray. What can we learn from this seasonal, cinematic favorite? Well, you can learn that, for purposes of the company holiday party, you should consider “Scrooge-ing” yourself. office holiday party

In the movie, Bill Murray’s character, Frank Cross (the modern day Scrooge), is visited by three ghosts, several of whom transport him back in time to certain life events that froze his heart and led to his hatred for Christmas. During one of his time-traveling trips, Frank visits his office during a wild late-1960s holiday party. People are seen drinking heavily, dancing, flirting with coworkers, and dressing inappropriately, and one woman, Tina (who is wearing a rather skimpy Santa’s helper outfit) is even handing out photocopies of her derriere. As the coworkers are partying with reckless impunity, Frank passes through the party while completing his work tasks. Frank is wearing his work attire and is not drinking. The boss asks Frank to note the ongoing party and implies that he should join. Frank politely declines and advises his boss that he has several projects that he needs to complete. Tina then approaches Frank, hands him a copy of her “resume,” and appears particularly enthused to see Frank. Frank essentially brushes her off and goes about his work. The merry office party, like the little drummer boy, marches on.

read more…

3 tips on firing employees—Les Miles/Mark Richt “silly season” edition

December 01, 2015 - by: Josh Sudbury 0 COMMENTS
Josh Sudbury

With the college football regular season coming to a close, you may have noticed that a different kind of season has begun, a time referred to by authors and sports bloggers alike as “silly season.” The fun (and farce) is typically kicked off by the mid- to late-season rumors that a formerly promising coach of a prominent program will be shown the door as soon as the clock hits zero at the last game. Many times their replacementthe one who will certainly be able to finally take us all the way!is an unproven coordinator from a rival school, an up-and-coming head coach from a lesser conference or division, or even more hilariously, a head coach recently given the boot by another program. Laid off-Head in hand

This year, the biggest rumors surrounded LSU head coach Les Miles, a man with a career winning percentage above 75% at LSU, a national championship, an SEC championship, multiple SEC West division championships, and seven seasons with 10 wins or more. And let’s not forget Les also had a buyout provision in his contract worth a reported $15 million, which allegedly was “not an issue” for the LSU booster club, despite the fact that the university itself is on the verge of bankruptcy. Thankfully, cooler heads prevailed after the Tigers took down Texas A&M in Baton Rouge 19-7.

read more…

 Page 1 of 13  1  2  3  4  5 » ...  Last »