When the floodgates open, expect water at your doorstep

November 13, 2017 - by: David Kim 0 COMMENTS
David Kim

About a month ago, my colleague Kristin Gray wrote about the breaking Harvey Weinstein scandal and best practices for employers to prevent harassment and discrimination from invading the workplace. And while I have no intention of reiterating any of the excellent points Kristin covered in her piece, it would be ignoring the obvious not to say that a lot has transpired since that breaking news story.

Virtually every day since then, additional allegations of sexual harassment and misconduct have been made against prominent public figures. Not just individuals in Hollywood (which include everyone from executives, producers, writers and actors), but also against politicians, publishers, and editors from various media organizations, news contributors, restaurateurs, and a slew of others. On top of these serious allegations, numerous individuals (both public figures and “regular” individuals like you and me) have used social media to share their own stories or harassment, not only sexually based but also other forms of harassment and bullying within the workplace.

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Workplace romances: Do they ‘Suit’ your company?

November 07, 2017 - by: Angela Cummings 0 COMMENTS
Angela Cummings

Like almost everyone I know, I love the ability to binge-watch television series these days. In fact, it is a rare occurrence that I ever watch any show at the time it actually airs. (This Is Us is a notable exception for me.) Instead, I enjoy delving into these characters’ lives several hours at a time. One such show that I am currently gorging on is Suits, which is in its 7th season and airs on the USA NetwBusinesswoman Receiving Red Rosesork. A fellow attorney recommended this show to me, but I was reluctant at first, as I often shy away from legal programsI have practiced law for almost 20 years and television should be an escape for me, right?!

For those who have yet to watch Suits, the premise is as follows: Harvey Specter is a Harvard-educated attorney at a top Manhattan corporate law firm where every case is high-stakes. He hires a brilliant associate, Mike Ross, who had falsified his background to state that he has graduated from Harvard Law School. The truth is, Mike never even graduated from college, much less law school. However, Mike possesses such a talented legal mind that Harvey keeps him on at the firm anyway. (This “falsification of workplace documents” issue involving Mike could certainly be a topic of a future blog….) While working at the firm, Mike falls for a co-worker, Rachel Zane, who is a paralegal. In her role as a paralegal, Rachel “reports” to Mike on many of the cases they handle. Mike and Rachel begin a relationship, secretly at first. Then, other co-workers at various levels learn about the relationship. While this all makes for great television, workplace romances can create headaches when they pop up in our real workplaces.

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Halloween at work: Don’t get BOOed by your employees!

October 30, 2017 - by: Angela Cummings 0 COMMENTS
Angela Cummings

Halloween can be such a fun holiday for kids of all ages. When October 31st falls on a weekday, as it does this year, ghoulish fun will certainly creep its way into the workplace. How can you, as a human resources professional, ensure that the day is more fun than it is scary? Simple. Just follow a few rules.Halloween theme 3

1: Make any Halloween office festivities totally voluntary

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Methinks thou doth protest too much! FYI, only ‘reasonable’ opposition is protected

October 24, 2017 - by: Marilyn Moran 0 COMMENTS
Marilyn Moran

It seems that every day the news is full of stories about employees (whether they are NFL players or Hollywood starlets) protesting unfair treatment. Usually, when an employee complains about discrimination, harassment, equal pay, or other work-related topics, he or she is protected from discipline or termination because the conduct is considered “protected activity” under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and a myriad of other federal and state employment laws.  Hand holding protest sign

Under limited circumstances, however, an employee’s protests may cross the line from protected opposition to unprotected disruption. Specifically, an employee who engages in loud, unreasonable, and disruptive protests at work, even though the action is borne out of an attempt to protest alleged unfair treatment or discrimination, isn’t protected by Title VII. Rather, only reasonable opposition and reasonable protests are considered protected activity. read more…

Think before you joke so you don’t have to litigate what’s ‘funny’

October 16, 2017 - by: Robin Kallor 0 COMMENTS
Robin Kallor

Studies show that laughing boosts immunity, eases anxiety and stress, improves mood, decreases pain, and can even prevent heart disease. Socially, laughing strengthens relationships. In addition to the value of humor in our personal lives, we cannot underestimate the power of humor at work. Humor aids in learning and memory retention, increases our ability to persuade others, and helps us to diffuse conflict. Distilled to its most simplest terms: Laughing feels good, and because of this, we enjoy being aroundand actually seek outpeople who make us laugh, not just in our personal lives, but also at work.  Businesspeople laughing in conference room

But, beware: Not all humor is appropriate in the workplace, both in content and in the context in which it is used. Humor can alienate people and constitute unlawful conduct. In his new memoir, Giant of the Senate, Senator Al Franken explained his initial deliberate decision to be “unfunny” following his lengthy career in comedy in order to be taken seriously during his Senate race and his tenure in office. He discussed his frustration when old jokes from his comedy career were resurrected by his political opponents during his first Senate race, which were taken wholly out of context during his campaign. When he tried to explain the context of one of his jokes to reporters and how it was funny, the humor did not translate and became publicly embarrassing for him.  It was then that he learned a valuable lesson about politicsYou can’t litigate a joke.” Because, as he reasoned, “when you’re explaining, you are losing.

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Harvey Weinstein: beauty and the beastly mogul

October 12, 2017 - by: Kristin Starnes Gray 0 COMMENTS
Kristin Starnes Gray

Over the last week, the fallout from a New York Times article regarding Harvey Weinstein has been swift and significant. On October 5, the Times published an explosive story about Hollywood producer and media mogul Weinstein’s alleged sexual harassment spanning decades. More and more women have been coming forward since the story broke to accuse Weinstein of unwelcome sexual advances and sexual assault during his time at Miramax and the Weinstein Company. The Times quoted Weinstein as stating, “I appreciate the way I’ve behaved with colleagues in the past has caused a lot of pain, and I sincerely apologize for it. Though I’m trying to do better, I know that I have a long way to go.”  Stop Sexual Harassment red stop sign held by a female

According to the Times, Weinstein has reached settlements with at least eight women over the years, and his former attorney, Lisa Bloom, has described him as “an old dinosaur learning new ways.” The growing list of allegations stands in stark contrast against Weinstein’s public image as a liberal, humanitarian, and champion of women. The Times quoted Ashley Judd as saying, “Women have been talking about Harvey amongst ourselves for a long time, and it’s simply beyond time to have the conversation publicly.”

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Providing grief relief in age of mass shootings

October 04, 2017 - by: Rachel E. Kelly 0 COMMENTS
Rachel E. Kelly

Las Vegas City SunsetThe headlines rang out early Monday morning as many of us were preparing to leave home for work: DEADLIEST MASS SHOOTING IN US HISTORY. Coffee. IT WAS MADNESS. Toasted bagel. 50+ KILLED, MORE THAN 500 INJURED. Orange Juice. THERE WAS BLOOD EVERYWHERE.

Sunday night at the highlight concert of the Route 91 Harvest Festival, 64-year-old Steven Paddock smashed out two windows in his 32nd floor suite at the Mandalay Bay Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas and rained down terror on the 20,000+ unassuming concertgoers at the festival below. To date, the death toll has risen to 59, with more than 527 injured victims.

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What’s your salary? Apparently none of my business

September 25, 2017 - by: David Kim 0 COMMENTS
David Kim

We all know that movie stars make a ton of money. I mean, a ton of moneyUnequalPay. How much? Well, last month Forbes published its list of the world’s highest paid actresses and actors for the previous year so you can see for yourself. There are certainly some surprises on the list.

No offense, but how is Adam Sandler the fourth highest paid actor at $50.5 million the past year? Admittedly, he had a murderer’s row in the 90’s that included such classics as Happy Gilmore, Billy Madison, and The Wedding Singer, but that was decades ago, and let’s just say my taste in movies when I was in high school and college was a bit more immature. “Chlorophyll? More like Bore-o-phyll! Right?”

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Magnum, SMH

September 20, 2017 - by: Matt Gilley 0 COMMENTS
Matt Gilley

Who could possibly sully the sainted memory of Thomas Magnum, fictional private investigator and iconic 1980s bon vivant? All 45 of these guys, apparentlyMan partying

Here’s a quick hit in case you don’t want to follow the link: Bachelor partygoers decided they would take in a baseball game in Detroit between the Tigers and the Chicago White Sox. All 45 partiers (if only I were so well-liked) dressed as television’s best-known Detroit Tigers fan, Magnum, P.I. The fellows must have left their Higginses behind because they weren’t on their best behavior (hijinks during a bachelor partyperish the thought!). Eventually, the Tigers brass kicked all 45 Tom Selleck doppelgängers from Comerica Park.

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Train ‘em up

September 12, 2017 - by: Matt Gilley 0 COMMENTS
Matt Gilley

If you’re a poor soul who’s followed enough of my posts to spot patterns, you’ll spot one here. Maybe I’m a broken record, maybe I’m simple-minded, or maybe I really like baseball.  Personal development career

Baseball speaks to me. The U.S. is still a blip in the long course of human history. We cobbled together our identity from bits of preceding cultures, but baseball is one thing we claim as uniquely ours. Annie Savoy, Susan Sarandon’s character in Bull Durham, put it well: read more…

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