“It’s not me, it’s you!” Seinfeld lessons on candid employee evaluations

July 27, 2015 - by: Ed Carlstedt 0 COMMENTS
Ed Carlstedt

I confess, I’m a Seinfeld junkie. I’ve watched every episode multiple times and literally love every single oneeven the finale (I know, I know, I’m in the vast minority, but I’m committed, you could at least give me that). To this day, I watch Seinfeld’s re-runs over and over again, which I’m sure makes me cute in a geeky, boy-next-door kind of way, at least that’s what I tell myself. My wife just rolls her eyes and continues Facebooking, Tweeting, Instagramming, Pinteresting, Ashley Madisoning (actual users note recent security breach and structure assets accordingly), or whatever other social networking it is she does during my near daily half hour of “Ed time.” But irrespective of Seinfeld’s purported outdated-ness (likely not a word, but you’re smart, you understand), the fashions, Jerry’s updating (dating someone much hotter than you), or the fact that it is primarily intended for comedic purposes, employers can glean valuable lessons from Seinfeld if they watch closely.  Performance Evaluation

In Seinfeld episode number 140 (“The Fatigues”), Elaine, serving as interim company president while her boss is in Burma, is all set to can an employee for poor performance. Prior to meeting the employee, Elaine seems almost giddy to figuratively drop the guillotine on the unsuspecting employee. But once Elaine confronts the employee in person, Elaine can’t bring herself to do the deed, likely due to the fact that the employee is wearing fatigues, looks deranged, and has a spooky, guttural voice. Rather than deliver the news, Elaine promotes the employee from a mailroom position to a copywriter position.

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Donald Trump will win (a Title VII lawsuit)

July 20, 2015 - by: Brian Kurtz 2 COMMENTS
Brian Kurtz

This is an entertainment-centered blog and therefore as good a place as any to discuss Donald Trump. By now you are surely aware of the nuanced approach Trump took toward U.S.-Mexico immigration policy in his presidential bid announcementDonald Trump

“When Mexico sends its people, they’re not sending their best. They’re not sending you. They’re not sending you. They’re sending people that have lots of problems, and they’re bringing those problems with us. They’re bringing drugs. They’re bringing crime. They’re rapists. And some, I assume, are good people.”

If you are of Mexican national origin, that stings. If you are of Mexican national origin and are employed at Trump Plaza, or at the Trump Taj Mahal, or work on the Miss USA Pageant broadcast, you may be asking yourself whether Trump’s remarks could give rise to a discrimination or harassment lawsuit under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. read more…

The Devil Wears Prada: Meryl Streep and the Queen Bee myth

Kristin Starnes Gray

You’ve seen her splashed across the big screen, small screen, computer screen, and even your tablet screen, but have you ever actually met the fabled Executive Queen Bee? We’re talking about the stereotypical top female executive who stomps on other women on her way to the top, reveling in her success while ignoring or sabotaging the advancement of other women. According to a recent study by researchers at Columbia Business School and the University of Maryland’s business school, this Executive Queen Bee is a myth.  Queen Bee

A recent Washington Post article spotlighted this intriguing study noting, “One of the most enduring stereotypes in the American workplace is that of the ‘queen bee’: the executive female who, at best, doesn’t help the women below her get ahead and, at worst, actively hinders them.” Meryl Streep (an outspoken activist for wage equality and women’s rights) famously and stylishly portrayed a fictional Queen Bee in The Devil Wears Prada, which is based on a best-selling novel of the same name. In the film and novel, Streep’s character (Miranda Priestly) alternates between coldly ignoring and hotly abusing her female minions. For example, she demands that one of her female assistants acquire the new, unpublished Harry Potter novel with the underlying threat of immediate termination for failure to complete this seemingly impossible task. Such characters clearly make for excellent box office and book sales, but are these Executive Queen Bees a reality of the modern workplace?

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Avoiding the “own goal” at work: 3 lessons from Women’s World Cup

July 06, 2015 - by: Josh Sudbury 0 COMMENTS
Josh Sudbury

On Sunday, the United States Women’s National Team (USWNT) soundly defeated Japan to claim the nation’s third World Cup championship. With this year’s Women’s World Cup breaking TV ratings expectations at every turn, it’s likely you or someone you know was glued to the tube as this spectacular victory unfolded. I know I was. And as I watched “el jogo bonito,” I was reminded of three simple lessons that translate well from the pitch to the office. Soccer World Cup

#1: Deal with the draw

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Kinder, gentler Terminator: how to say ‘Hasta la vista’ to employees without getting sued

June 29, 2015 - by: Marilyn Moran 0 COMMENTS
Marilyn Moran

Terminator Genisys, the fifth installment in the wildly popular action film series, hits theaters this week. Over the last 30 years, the original Terminator, played by Arnold Schwarzenegger, has transformed from a soulless assassin with no regard for others to a cyborg protector with a heart of gold (actually it’s mimetic polyalloy, but you get my point). Skull of a human size robot

When it comes to being a Terminator at your business, I hope your methods also have evolved since the 1980s. If not, here are five tips for handling employee terminations in today’s legal climate: read more…

Categories: Firing / Hollywood / Marilyn Moran

Jenner, Dolezal, and the transformative debate

June 22, 2015 - by: David Kim 0 COMMENTS
David Kim

The names Caitlyn Jenner and Rachel Dolezal have been inexorably intertwined over the last couple weeks by the mainstream media and social pundits, including a debate as to whether these two individuals’ circumstances should even be intertwined because they represent entirely different discussions regarding social justice and identity. Identity Crisis

As most know, Caitlyn Jenner, formerly known as Bruce Jenner, came out publicly as transgender and her transition has been a fairly high-profile affair. Other than negative reactions from a select faction of people, Jenner has received mainly overwhelming support. Not so for Dolezal, a former head of the Spokane, Washington, NAACP chapter when it was recently revealed she is actually Caucasian but claims to identify as black. Dolezal has received criticism from all-comers regardless of race, age, or political or social affiliation.

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Heeere’s Johnny!!! Or, what horrors lurk in your building?

June 15, 2015 - by: Matt Gilley 0 COMMENTS
Matt Gilley

If you’ve seen The Shining you certainly remember the scene when Jack Nicholson’s character, now thoroughly possessed by the Overlook Hotel’s diabolical spirits, hefts an axe and chases his wife through the snowbound resort. Cornering her in a bathroom, he splinters the door and bellows, “Heeere’s Johnny!”  Whats around the corner

Scary stuff, for sure. For me, though, I can’t bear to watch their young son–affectionately, “Doc”–tooling around the sprawling hotel on his big-wheel tricycle. Stanley Kubrick’s cinematography in that scene is perfect: The orange glow in the hallways signals danger worse than you would find in a dark, dank, cobwebbed mausoleum. Eventually, Doc turns a corner to find two spectral little girls, which cost me much more sleep than the sight of Jack Nicholson with an axe.

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Ode to Letterman: EntertainHR’s own Top 10

June 06, 2015 - by: David Kim 0 COMMENTS
David Kim

David Letterman, a late-night staple for 33 years, aired his final episode on May 20, 2015. Whether you preferred Johnny, Leno, Conan, Kimmel, or Fallon, no one can deny Letterman’s impact on pop culture, and the fact remains that he retires as the longest-serving late-night talk show host in American television history. While there were certainly some missteps along the way (the “Oprah…Uma” Academy Awards debacle undoubtedly qualifies), Letterman’s comedic and late-night chops cannot be denied. CBS Late night show entrance sign

As Letterman’s career winds down, our EntertainHR blog approaches just its one-year anniversary next month (after many years of chronicling the TV show The Office in Ford Harrison’s earlier blog “That’s What She Said”). Therefore, in homage to Letterman, and in the vein of shameless self-promotion, we contributors to EntertainHR have decided to regale our readers with a top 10 list.

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Gall, Blatter

June 01, 2015 - by: Brian Kurtz 2 COMMENTS
Brian Kurtz

Joseph “Sepp” Blatter is a man whose name seems an adjective as much as a proper noun. Blatter, as you likely know by now, was just elected to a fifth term as President of the Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the international umbrella organization for international soccer. The 79-year-old Blatter was his typically arrogant and tone-deaf self after his election victory, but one wonders if privately he is lining up some Ballon d’Or-caliber legal counsel.FIFA headquarter in Zurich, Switzerland

Because the Yanks are coming.

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Dirty Dancing: hot summer hiring considerations

Kristin Starnes Gray

With summer quickly approaching, it’s time to pull out those warm-weather clothes and dust off my copy of Dirty Dancing, one of my favorite summer films. Who can forget the summer of 1963 when Baby performed her triumphant lift, Johnny taught us about standing up for others no matter what it costs us, and we all learned that no one puts Baby in the corner. Like many resorts and other types of employers, the fictional Kellerman’s resort in the Catskills Mountains (actually filmed in North Carolina and Virginia) has a very clear peak season in the warmer months with the hiring of a lot of additional employees, including high school and college students seeking summer employment.  Of course, any time an employer hires minors, there are special considerations and it is important to be familiar with applicable federal and state law. iStock_000057051752_Full

The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) is the federal law governing child labor, but it must be read together with state laws (which may be more stringent and must be observed). These laws were designed to protect the educational opportunities of minors and prohibit their employment in hazardous jobs and under conditions detrimental to their health and well-being. To this end, the FLSA and state laws limit the types of jobs minors may hold as well as the hours they may work.

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