Food bank works toward goals of diversity and inclusion

July 16, 2017 0 COMMENTS

Editor’s note: Many organizations want to improve diversity and inclusion, but they don’t know where to start.  The Food Bank of Western Massachusetts is one such organization, and members of the organization’s in-house committee have provided this report on the first year of their program in the hope that other organizations can learn from their experience.  The Food Bank of Western Massachusetts

The Food Bank of Western Massachusetts

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Unconscious bias: Employers learning how to fight problems they don’t see

March 20, 2016 0 COMMENTS

Efforts to create more diverse workplaces have landed on many employers’ radar screens in recent years. The tech industry, notably, has been exposed as being overwhelmingly male and white, leading some of those influential employers to do some soul searching. They and employers in an array of other fields have devised programs resulting in improvement, but they acknowledge that more progress is needed on the diversity front.  Stereotype

Now that many employers have implemented programs aimed at hiring, retaining, and promoting a diverse workforce, a new termunconscious biasis coming into the spotlight. But how can employers fight something if they’re not conscious of it? If people don’t even see their biases, they’re fighting blind. That may sound nearly impossible, but those who have studied the issue have identified ways to start.

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EEO Training Makes Economic Sense Even in the Worst of Times

August 15, 2010 0 COMMENTS

By Sam R. Fulkerson

According to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), 93,277 workplace discrimination charges were filed nationwide during 2009 ― the second-highest level ever ― and monetary relief obtained for victims totaled more than $376 million. The 2009 data show that private-sector job bias charges alleging discrimination based on disability, religion, and national origin hit record highs. The number of charges alleging age-based discrimination reached the second-highest level ever.

Continuing a decade-long trend, the most frequently filed charges with the EEOC in 2009 were those alleging retaliation (36%) and discrimination based on race (36%) and sex (30%). “The latest data tell us that, as the first decade of the 21st century comes to a close, the Commission’s work is far from finished,” said EEOC Acting Chairman Stuart J. Ishimaru. He added, “Employers must step up their efforts to foster discrimination-free and inclusive workplaces, or risk enforcement and litigation by the EEOC.”

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