When words used in a disciplinary report suggest implicit bias

September 17, 2017 0 COMMENTS

by Barbara J. Koenig

Implicit bias is an unconscious preference for or an aversion to a person or a group of people. In other words, we may have an attitude toward others or stereotype them without conscious knowledge of what we’re doing. If we act in accordance with our implicit bias, we may be discriminating against a person or a group of people without even being aware of our bias. Two recent cases illustrate the fact that HR managers need to educate supervisors on implicit bias and how a seemingly straightforward description of an employee or a workplace incident can suggest racial animus and unconscious discrimination.  Bias

Seemingly innocent words suggest bias

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Diversity and inclusion director gets a little inclusion

August 20, 2017 0 COMMENTS

by Michelle Lee Flores

The California Court of Appeal threw a solitary bone to Toyota’s director of diversity and inclusion when it reversed a trial court’s dismissal of his sexual orientation discrimination claim. The court of appeal held that the former employee had provided sufficient evidence that a senior manager’s perception that he was “too gay” was a substantial motivating factor for his termination. However, his evidence of sex or gender stereotyping didn’t support, and therefore didn’t save, his retaliation and wrongful discharge claims, both of which were dismissed by the trial court without going to the jury.  Justice is served

Diversity and inclusion director feels excluded

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Warding off age discrimination claims in era of older workers

December 18, 2016 0 COMMENTS

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts that nearly a quarter of the workforce will be made up of people age 55 and older by 2024. That contrasts to 1994, when just 11.9 percent of workers fell into that age group. If the projection for 2024 is correctand the aging of the baby boomer generation as well as other factors provide a solid basis for the forecastemployers need to take a look at how to handle a large number of workers under the protection of federal and state age discrimination laws.   Businessman showing a document to his colleague

The BLS figures, reported in a November 18 U.S. Department of Labor Blog post, show that the 55 and older crowd is expected to constitute the largest slice of the workforce pie in just eight years. Here’s the breakdown for 2024: read more…

The digital natives are restless

October 16, 2016 0 COMMENTS

Unconscious bias: Employers learning how to fight problems they don’t see

March 20, 2016 0 COMMENTS

Efforts to create more diverse workplaces have landed on many employers’ radar screens in recent years. The tech industry, notably, has been exposed as being overwhelmingly male and white, leading some of those influential employers to do some soul searching. They and employers in an array of other fields have devised programs resulting in improvement, but they acknowledge that more progress is needed on the diversity front.  Stereotype

Now that many employers have implemented programs aimed at hiring, retaining, and promoting a diverse workforce, a new termunconscious biasis coming into the spotlight. But how can employers fight something if they’re not conscious of it? If people don’t even see their biases, they’re fighting blind. That may sound nearly impossible, but those who have studied the issue have identified ways to start.

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