Rural counties must reverse Millennial labor drain

May 14, 2017 0 COMMENTS

by Dinita L. James

Hillbilly Elegy: Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis is the nonfiction best seller by J.D. Vance, 31, of Middletown, Ohio, with roots in the hills of Kentucky. He has gained renown since the November 2016 presidential election as a Donald Trump “voter-splainer,” a tribune of the white working poor.  Work and lifestyle crossroads concept

One thing that stood out was his report that the six groomsmen from his wedding all grew up in Ohio small towns, attended college at Ohio State University, found careers outside their hometowns, and had no interest in ever going back. Just as their parents had left their rural homes for jobs in cities and towns, Vance and his friends abandoned their hometowns for metropolises. Vance, a Yale-educated lawyer, lives in San Francisco and is a principal in a Silicon Valley investment firm. He writes that he has all he ever wanted—going to work each day, taking his dogs to the park, buying groceries with his wife, and making a nice dinner.

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Walking the line between hiring only authorized workers and violating the discrimination laws

March 19, 2017 0 COMMENTS

by Elaine Young

Here are two situations in which you must avoid discrimination while fulfilling your obligation to hire only authorized workers.  Form and pen - 2

Situation #1

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Want to add diversity by hiring veterans? Make sure policies don’t get in the way

November 20, 2016 0 COMMENTS

This month’s celebration of Veterans Day may have sparked interest among employers to recruit and hire veterans. After all, many employers tout the diversity of thought and skills employees with military experience bring to the workforce. Too often, though, policies and a lack of understanding throw up barriers to bringing veterans on board.  young man with split careers businessman and soldier

State licensing and certification requirements often are responsible for the barriers veterans face, but help may be on the way on those fronts. The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) recently released a toolkit to help states knock down hurdles presented by state licensure and third-party certification systems. A DOL blog post explains that the kit includes best practices, tips, and resources to accelerate initiatives from the various states to address gaps in veterans’ licensing and certification.

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The digital natives are restless

October 16, 2016 0 COMMENTS

Fair Chance Business Pledge offers new way to evaluate applicants with criminal records

October 16, 2016 0 COMMENTS

by Kaitlin L.H. Robidoux

The White House is urging businesses to take the Fair Chance Business Pledge and commit to providing individuals with criminal records “a fair chance to participate in the American economy.” The idea behind the initiative is that individuals with a criminal history have trouble finding employment, and many communities are hurt because of the lack of gainfully employed residents and good role models. Because nearly one in three adults—almost 70 million Americans—has a criminal record, a large number of people and communities are affected when individuals with a criminal history cannot find employment.  Young man in handcuffs

More than 100 organizations have taken the pledge, including American Airlines, Coca-Cola, Facebook, Google, the Hershey Company, Johns Hopkins Hospital and Health System, Koch Industries, PepsiCo, Prudential, and Starbucks, to name just a few. So if your company is interested in taking the pledge, what considerations should you think through?

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Premier teamwork: Soccer champs’ victory offers lessons for HR pros

August 14, 2016 0 COMMENTS

by Peter Lowe

They were a rag-tag group of has-beens, rejects, and journeymen. They were hired at low wages and with even lower expectations. A recently fired 64-year-old Italian was hired to manage them. They enjoyed a 138-year history, yet no history of success. The odds of the team winning the championship were 5,000 to 1. Yet in May, the team—Leicester City—defied the odds and was crowned champion of the English Premier League. The story of how lowly Leicester City became the champion of one of the world’s richest, most competitive, and far-reaching sports leagues provides valuable tips for HR professionals. LeicesterCity celebrates Championship of English Premiere League in Thailand

Diversity

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Ivy League or State U? Employers considering educational diversity

November 15, 2015 0 COMMENTS

Once upon a time a resume touting a prestigious university would automatically land at the top of a recruiter’s stack. Conventional wisdom dictated that a degree from an esteemed school signaled the best-educated, highest-potential candidates. But now a desire for educational diversity may be changing the old way of thinking.

Professional services firm Deloitte announced in late September that its United Kingdom operations would introduce a university-blind interview system for entry-level recruits “to help prevent unconscious bias and ensure that job offers are made on the basis of present potential, not past personal circumstance,” according to a post on the company’s blog.College Diploma, Cap, and Tassel

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Friend or foe: illegal or inappropriate interview questions

October 18, 2015 0 COMMENTS

by Michelle Dougherty

Asking illegal or inappropriate interview questions is one of the easiest ways for an employer to create a risk for discrimination claims. It isn’t unusual for polite, friendly, personal, non-job-specific conversation to be part of the interview process. However, when conducting an interview, you must always be aware that even indirect or inadvertent questions about a protected characteristic can give rise to a discrimination claim.  Job Interview Questions

Friendly may mean illegal

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The tragedy at Emanuel AME

June 18, 2015 6 COMMENTS

by Rick Morgan

Today’s current events are rife with bad news. The despicable and senseless murders at Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, South Carolina, do not end at the doors of this historical house of worship. The event, however, does bring into focus an issue that our country and workplaces continue to wrestle with on a daily basis—that of race.  Stop Hate

I will digress for a moment to talk about two points. In 1968, as a college freshman, I was fortunate to be able to earn a spot on our college’s basketball team. I was one of the 12 who got to travel and dress for away games. When we traveled, our coach would pair up players to share rooms for the night. One time, he came to me and told me he needed me to share a room with one of my teammates, which I was happy to do. The coach explained he was pairing us together because I was the only one who he felt would have no objections to the room assignment, which I did not. My teammate was black, and I am white. It really shouldn’t have mattered, but that was the unfortunate state of race relations in the 1960s.

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Risk or reward? Ex-offenders present challenge to employers

May 17, 2015 0 COMMENTS

In a quest for workforce diversity, employers go to great lengths to reach out to people of various races, ethnicities, genders, ages, and backgrounds. But they’re not so likely to reach out to those who have spent time in prison. Yet employers often express a desire to be good corporate citizens that “give back” to their communities. Businessman chained to a large ball

So to hire someone once incarcerated for a crime represents a risk since ex-offenders may slip back into their old ways. But to hire people struggling to get back on their feet, support themselves and their families, and generally contribute to their community can be a risk worth taking, even rewarding for employers.

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