Harrah’s chief diversity officer redefines inclusion

June 16, 2008 - by: Diversity Insight 1 COMMENTS

Traditionally, companies have thought that diversity is all about race and gender. Nowhere is that more the case than in the hospitality industry, which, in many jurisdictions, is held to certain legal standards.

But Fred Keeton didn’t want to just meet those standards. As Harrah’s Entertainment’s chief diversity officer, he has spent the past three years attempting to revolutionize the concept of diversity and, in the process, demonstrate to senior management that inclusion is the key to business survival. “So many professionals are caught up in the old way of thinking about diversity,” he says. “They have not even taken their definition of inclusion beyond the politically correct attachment solely to identity.”

read more…

Categories: Feature

Recruiting GLBT employees makes sense

June 16, 2008 - by: Diversity Insight 1 COMMENTS

Gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender (GLBT) professionals are being increasingly targeted by corporate America — as both employees and customers. According to new research, the industry doing the best job of it is the financial services sector. In the Human Rights Campaign’s (HRC) most recent annual Corporate Equality Index, 32 employers in the financial services industry received a perfect score of 100 percent, the most of any other industry.

Daryl Herrschaft, director of the study, says financial services firms like JP Morgan Chase and Capital One ranked so well for both humane and business reasons. “The GLBT community is estimated to have $680 billion in purchasing power,” he said in a release. “Not only does being good on these issues allow companies to tap into that market, it also creates a more productive workplace and improves recruitment and retention.”

read more…

Categories: Seeking Talent

Do domestic partner benefits make sense for you?

June 16, 2008 - by: Diversity Insight 1 COMMENTS

So you read the previous article and want to make your company more friendly to your gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgendered (GLBT) employees (and therefore the GLBT community). A good first step is offering domestic partner benefits as a recruiting tool. Simply put, domestic partner benefits are benefits offered to an employee’s unmarried partner, regardless of sexual orientation. Besides being an effective recruiting tool, domestic partner benefits also send a message that all employees are valued equally.

The average benefits plan can amount to nearly one-quarter of an employee’s total compensation package, with roughly half of that devoted to health insurance. For most GLBT employees, the portion of those benefit plans that covers a traditional employee’s dependents is unavailable, creating significant disparity in compensation and the inferred value of that employee’s contributions to the company.

read more…

Categories: Keeping Talent

A study of older Americans: Statistics from the U.S. Census Bureau

June 16, 2008 - by: Diversity Insight 0 COMMENTS

Senior citizens — those 65 and older — aren’t just sitting around in their rocking chairs. More and more, they are making up a vital part of the workforce. Here are some statistics about Americans age 65 and older from the U.S. Census Bureau.

  • There were 37.3 million people 65 and older in the United States on July 1, 2006. This age group accounted for 12 percent of the total population. Between 2005 and 2006, this age group increased by 473,000 people.

read more…

Categories: Just the Facts

NY corrections department must pay $1 million for discrimination in settlement with EEOC

June 16, 2008 - by: Diversity Insight 0 COMMENTS

The New York State Department of Correctional Services will pay almost $1 million to settle a sex discrimination lawsuit filed by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) and the U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York. The department was accused of providing inferior benefits to female employees on maternity leave.

Both male and female employees with work-related injuries were given up to six months of paid workers’ compensation leave. However, pregnant employees on such leave were involuntarily switched to maternity leave at or around the time they gave birth. The EEOC said that practice resulted in lesser benefits for those women due to their sex and thus violated the Equal Pay Act (EPA).

read more…

Categories: Legal News

Honor your mothers and fathers: Avoid family responsibility discrimination

May 18, 2008 - by: Diversity Insight 0 COMMENTS

Mother’s Day has just passed, and Father’s Day is coming up, so what better time to talk about family responsibility discrimination (FRD)? According to a University of California Hastings College of the Law study, the number of FRD cases being filed with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) jumped almost 500 percent between 1971 and 2005. FRD happens when employers discriminate against employees based on stereotypes of family caregiving responsibilities.

Your supervisors and managers know that they can’t discriminate against employees based on stereotypes of sex, race, age, gender, religion, pregnancy, or disability (they do know that, right?). However, they may not realize that it’s FRD to assume, for instance, that a mother with three small children won’t want to travel for work or that a man would need to take time off to care for elderly parents. Since there’s no federal law expressly prohibiting FRD, employees claiming FRD traditionally have tied their claims to another form of discrimination (mainly gender).

read more…

Categories: Feature

Keeping Talent: How to hold on to your youngest workers

May 18, 2008 - by: Diversity Insight 0 COMMENTS

We’ve already written about how to attract Gen Y workers — or Millennials, as they prefer to be called — but keeping them is an entirely different story.

“Millennials may be defined by the fact that they will never stop marketing themselves. Their resumes will be constantly updated online at social networking sites,” says Libby Sartain, senior vice president of HR for Yahoo!, which employs a large number of Gen Y professionals. “This poses a real challenge to organizations and HR. Our role will be one of constant re-recruiting of our own employees, while at the same time recruiting new employees.”

read more…

Question and Answer: Diversity ideal, but not always good for business

May 18, 2008 - by: Diversity Insight 0 COMMENTS

As president of San Diego training firm Cross-Cultural Communications, Sondra Thiederman has spent the last 25 years helping companies create diversity programs that actually work. Author of the book, Making Diversity Work: Seven Steps for Defeating Bias in the Workplace, Thiederman’s clients include General Motors, Xerox, Pfizer Pharmaceuticals, Marriott Corp., American Express, and AT&T. We asked her to shed some light on the right and wrong ways to approach corporate diversity.

Q: You’ve spent 25 years helping companies improve diversity. How have you seen corporate diversity evolve in that time?
A: The biggest change has been in how the word “diversity” is defined. It no longer refers, as it once did, to just race and gender differences. It has been broadened, in most corporate settings, to encompass any ways in which individual human beings differ, including such elements as place of birth, personality, and work style.

read more…

Categories: Q&A

Job-bias charges rose nine percent in 2007

May 18, 2008 - by: Diversity Insight 0 COMMENTS

Each year, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) publishes information about the number and type of discrimination charges employees have filed along with the amount of money it has recovered on their behalf. In fiscal year (FY) 2007, 82,792 private-sector discrimination charges were filed with the agency, and it recovered $345 million in monetary relief for job-bias victims.

Race, retaliation, and sex charges were the most frequently filed. Additionally, nearly all major charge categories showed double-digit percentage increases from the prior year – “a rare occurrence,” according to the EEOC. For the first time, retaliation surpassed sex-based charges to become the second highest charge category. Race-based charges have lead the types of charges filed every year since the EEOC opened in 1965.

read more…

Categories: Flashpoint

Razzoo’s to pay $1 million for sex bias against men in settlement with EEOC

May 18, 2008 - by: Diversity Insight 0 COMMENTS

According to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), Razzoo’s, a Dallas/Fort Worth-based restaurant chain, will pay $1 million and furnish significant remedial relief to settle a sex discrimination lawsuit. Razzoo’s operates 11 Cajun food restaurants throughout the Dallas/Fort Worth metropolis and also has locations in Houston and Concord, North Carolina.

The EEOC said that Razzoo’s refused to hire or promote men to the position of bartender in its restaurants. Razzoo’s management set up and communicated to managers by e-mail a plan for an 80-20 ratio of women to men behind the bar. Before this pretrial settlement, male applicants and servers were expected to testify at trial that managers told them the company wanted mostly “girls” behind the bar. Men who worked as servers at the restaurants were generally denied promotion to bartender because of their gender. The few men who were promoted to bartender weren’t allowed to work lucrative “girls-only” bartending events.

read more…

Categories: Flashpoint / Legal News

 Page 53 of 56  « First  ... « 51  52  53  54  55 » ...  Last »