Keeping the news out of the workplace

by Mark I. Schickman

Racial tensions in America have been dominating the news for several months. Not surprisingly, a new CBS/New York Times poll finds that over 60% of Americans believe that race relations in America are bad and getting worse—the highest percentage in 25 years.  Headline News

Some responses to these statistics will argue that arrests and detentions occur where crime exists and that there is simply more crime committed in communities of color. Others will argue that law enforcement officers have the most dangerous jobs around and should never be subject to “second-guessing.”

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Managing performance: 3 radical ideas

by Michael P. Maslanka

There are old and accepted ways of doing things, and there are new and bold ways. It’s your choice.  Employee motivation concept image with business icons and copyspace.

Are you thinking of changing your performance evaluation system? Are you tired of the meaningless nuance between a 3.5 and a 4.0 rating? Then pick up a copy of the April issue of Harvard Business Review, which is dedicated to reinventing performance measurement and incentivizing employees. One article explains the new performance evaluation system at Deloitte. Limited to four questions, it is simplicity itself.

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Passing on disabled candidates for safety reasons is risky business

by Erica E. Flores

Election season can bring out the best and worst in our nation. The important issues that should be the focus sometimes take a backseat to headline-grabbing one-liners. But true leaders emerge at some point in nearly every campaign. It remains to be seen which of this cycle’s large group of presidential contenders will have such a moment, but we can learn a lot from leaders of the past as we wait for it.  Caution Fork-lift trucks operating sign

On March 4, 1933, Franklin D. Roosevelt was inaugurated as the 32nd president of the United States. After taking the oath of office, he delivered his inaugural address. Speaking to a nation in the grip of the Great Depression, he famously told the American people that the only thing they had to fear was fear itself—”nameless, unreasoning, unjustified terror which paralyzes needed efforts to convert retreat into advance.” Eighty-two years later, Roosevelt’s words still ring true in many contexts, including the modern workplace.

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Policies designed to protect employees may do more harm than good

by Jeremy M. Brenner

The law prohibits discrimination against employees and applicants based on a number of protected statuses. Employers often implement policies that are intended to benefit workers but actually cause illegal systemic discrimination. Unfortunately, no matter how genuine an employer’s good intentions are, they typically do not excuse it from discriminatory conduct. Read on to learn some of the pitfalls employers face when implementing seemingly neutral — or even beneficial — workplace policies.   Folder with the label Policies

Facts

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Ivy League or State U? Employers considering educational diversity

November 15, 2015 - by: Tammy Binford 0 COMMENTS

Once upon a time a resume touting a prestigious university would automatically land at the top of a recruiter’s stack. Conventional wisdom dictated that a degree from an esteemed school signaled the best-educated, highest-potential candidates. But now a desire for educational diversity may be changing the old way of thinking.

Professional services firm Deloitte announced in late September that its United Kingdom operations would introduce a university-blind interview system for entry-level recruits “to help prevent unconscious bias and ensure that job offers are made on the basis of present potential, not past personal circumstance,” according to a post on the company’s blog.College Diploma, Cap, and Tassel

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Leading with emotional intelligence

by Jimmy Daniel

75% of careers are derailed for reasons related to emotional competencies, including inability to handle interpersonal problems; unsatisfactory team leadership during times of difficulty or conflict; or inability to adapt to change or elicit trust.

—The Center for Creative Leadership

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The H-1B loophole: replacing American workers with foreigners to cut costs

by Cristopher Willis

Each year, the United States grants 85,000 H-1B employment visas, and every single one is highly sought after by American companies. These temporary work visas allow companies to hire international applicants with college degrees—often advanced—in a variety of fields, such as medicine and health care, engineering, architecture, accounting, and the arts.P52 - Week 3 Circles - Mickey Power

H-1B visas broaden the pool of highly skilled workers from which an employer can draw, and federal guidelines allow their use only when American workers cannot be found. What’s not to love? Just ask the hundreds of Disney employees who were recently laid off.

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Human trafficking prevention and awareness law on the horizon

by Elizabeth B. Bradley

Do you know what lurks in your supply chain? Would you sign a certification subject to the penalties of perjury stating there is no human-trafficking-related activity anywhere in your company’s supply chain? For all federal contractors, the answer must already be “yes.” But new bills pending before Congress will bring these requirements to other U.S. employers.  trafficking

Federal contractors already covered

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Dealing with mental disabilities in the workplace

by Jonathan Mook

These days, the news is filled with stories of returning veterans who suffer from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) or other mental impairments and have problems adjusting to civilian life at home and in the workplace. The issues employers face when dealing with veterans and other employees with mental disorders were put on display by a Virginia case in which an Army veteran who suffers from PTSD sued his employer after he was fired for threatening to harm or kill other employees. The court’s decision provides helpful lessons about handling employees with mental disorders, especially when employees have legal protections under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) or the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act (USERRA)PTSD word cloud with abstract background

Background

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Looking to hire former service members? Veterans offer advice, encouragement

October 18, 2015 - by: Tammy Binford 0 COMMENTS

As Veterans Day approaches, the nation looks at ways to honor those who have served in the military. But honors alone don’t get former service members employed once they re-enter the civilian world. So employers need not just an understanding of the legal requirements related to employing or reemploying veterans; they also need to understand the attributes veterans bring and the challenges they face when searching for civilian employment.  Military Veteran Goes to Work

Paul J. Sweeney, an attorney with Coughlin & Gerhart, LLP in Binghamton, New York, logged 29 years of active and reserve service in the Marine Corps, including a deployment to Iraq. He points to important benefits employers enjoy when hiring veterans. “As a general rule, the armed forces sets high standards when recruiting service members,” Sweeney says. “Unlike the general population, more than nine out of 10 of those who enlist in the armed forces have a high school degree. Also, the armed forces screens out those with criminal convictions and drug issues.”

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