Unconscious bias training helps fuel diversity efforts at industrial gas company

November 19, 2017 - by: Diversity Insight 0 COMMENTS

Despite a strategy to promote an inclusive culture in your organization, unconscious bias could be undermining your efforts. That is why some companies proactively address unconscious bias through training.  Bias

Take Praxair, Inc. This global industrial gas company worked with a third-party training vendor in Fall 2014 to create content for “Unconscious Bias to Conscious Inclusion,” a half-day training program offered to all Praxair leaders, says Vanessa Abrahams-John, chief diversity office for Praxair. “We started offering the training to help our managers understand how unconscious bias can derail our diversity talent management efforts and their decision-making processes. Further, the training was thought to help develop impactful and sustainable solutions for diverse talent management—specifically, in recruitment, development, and, ultimately, retention.”

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Adventures in extreme workplace team building

by Michael P. Stafford

Does your company have a workplace morale problem? Do you want to foster improved collaboration and cooperation among employees as they work together to solve a problem? Have you ever considered addressing those concerns by simulating life-threatening crisis situations? And no, I don’t mean the annual company fire drill! If you haven’t, then perhaps you’ve never heard of Survival Systems USA in Connecticut. Hiking

Can’t we just go out for nachos instead?

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Rooting out bullying a necessary step in promoting diversity

October 15, 2017 - by: Tammy Binford 0 COMMENTS

Employers looking to advance diversity in the workplace often focus on recruiting diverse groups of potential employees, but recruiting is just one part of the process. Those recruiting efforts won’t be effective if management is blind to a culture that condones workplace bullying.  Big boss yelling to her employee with megaphone on fire

October is a time when attention turns to bullying in a variety of settings, schools in particular. But bullying at work takes a toll too, and the Workplace Bullying Institute (WBI) has designated October 15-21 as Freedom from Workplace Bullies Week.

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How non-Hispanic supervisors can lead Hispanic employees

October 15, 2017 - by: Diversity Insight 0 COMMENTS

by Jim Davis

Between potential language barriers, cultural differences, and a political and social landscape rife with discrimination, it’s important that any employee be able to navigate whatever challenges may arise while leading a diverse workforce. Glenn Llopis, a best-selling author, columnist, and senior advisor to Fortune 500 seeks to show how non-Hispanic employers and supervisors can better connect with their Hispanic workers.    Arrows Leadership Concept on Chalkboard

At SHRM’s 2017 Annual Conference and Exposition in New Orleans, Llopis presented a session entitled “Leading Hispanic Employees (for Non-Hispanic Supervisors).” He began with some wisdom from his father, who told him “you cannot sacrifice your identity.” Identity is at the heart of Llopis’s talk. He himself admits that the topic at hand can be an uncomfortable one. It requires facing some difficult issues about bias, belief structures, and cultural differences.

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Diversity and inclusion: America’s CEOs are showing the path forward

Switching gears: Shifting to reverse can rev up workplace mentoring

April 17, 2016 - by: Tammy Binford 0 COMMENTS

Researchers report that the millennial generation now makes up the largest share of the U.S. workforce. To be sure, the baby boomer and Generation X contingents remain strong, but the sheer number of younger workers makes them a force to be reckoned with. Longtime workers may think their young colleagues have a lot to learn, but employers are finding the youngest workers also have a lot to teach.  Two Women Working At Computer In Contemporary Office

Flipped, or reverse, mentoring is one way employers can cash in on the wisdom their youngest workers bring to the workforce. Mary George Opperman, vice president and chief human resources officer at Cornell University, is scheduled to present a talk called “Reverse Mentoring: Building Meaningful Intergenerational Relationships in the Workplace” at the Business and Legal Resources THRIVE 2016 Annual Conference, scheduled for May 12-13 in Las Vegas.

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The tragedy at Emanuel AME

by Rick Morgan

Today’s current events are rife with bad news. The despicable and senseless murders at Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, South Carolina, do not end at the doors of this historical house of worship. The event, however, does bring into focus an issue that our country and workplaces continue to wrestle with on a daily basis—that of race.  Stop Hate

I will digress for a moment to talk about two points. In 1968, as a college freshman, I was fortunate to be able to earn a spot on our college’s basketball team. I was one of the 12 who got to travel and dress for away games. When we traveled, our coach would pair up players to share rooms for the night. One time, he came to me and told me he needed me to share a room with one of my teammates, which I was happy to do. The coach explained he was pairing us together because I was the only one who he felt would have no objections to the room assignment, which I did not. My teammate was black, and I am white. It really shouldn’t have mattered, but that was the unfortunate state of race relations in the 1960s.

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Tech giants exploring gender gap within their ranks

January 18, 2015 - by: Tammy Binford 0 COMMENTS

What gives? The number of women graduating from college each year passed the number of men marking the same achievement years ago, but women remain underrepresented in the college majors sought by technology employers. That surely accounts for part of the gender gap afflicting tech employers, but corporate culture also is often seen as a culprit.

While it’s still largely a man’s world at the big tech companies in Silicon Valley and beyond, those employers are at least becoming self-conscious about the gender gap in their ranks. Last summer, tech leaders including Yahoo, Facebook, and Google joined the list of tech companies releasing figures showing how they lack diversity.  Gender gap

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The role of leadership in creating transgender-inclusive workplaces

August 12, 2014 - by: Diversity Insight 0 COMMENTS

by Dr. Jamison Green

Corporate leaders agree that diverse and inclusive workplaces are more productive, versatile, and adaptive in a changing marketplace. But often, when managers think of gender diversity, they think only about gender parity between men and women, or about opening traditionally male occupations to women, or vice versa. Creating a transgender-inclusive workplace is an opportunity to create even more awareness about gender, and to eliminate the prejudices and limitations we impose on people because of our assumptions about gender and sex stereotypes.  PositiveLeadership

Employers may not even be aware that they may already have transgender people in their workforce. Not all transgender people will go through an “on-the-job” transition, nor will they be “obvious” in their appearance. Some employees may have transgender family members or friends, and knowing that there are employers who actively do not discriminate against this segment of the population can be a source of relief and even pride.

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Training employees to eliminate unconscious bias

by Matthew A. Lafferman

Everyone has unconscious or subconscious preferences. Generally, we all prefer to associate or socialize with people who share our background and interests. As a consequence, we often aren’t aware of our preferences, identifying our behavior only when it’s pointed out by someone else. Unfortunately, we carry our hidden biases into the workplace, and that’s when problems may arise.   Bias

Employees’ hidden biases

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