HR’s work not over when harassment investigation ends

December 17, 2017 - by: Tammy Binford 0 COMMENTS

As more and more people are coming forward with claims of sexual harassment in the workplace, employers have rightly focused on making internal investigations thorough and effective. But the work doesn’t end when the investigation is wrapped up. In fact, it may be just beginning, according to an attorney and a human resources expert who urge employers to dig deep into any lingering issues that may harm the work environment.  Person's Hand Stopping Dominos Falling On Desk

It’s not enough to just determine what, if any, harassment has taken place and who’s responsible, since technical violations or nonviolations of an employer’s antiharassment policy don’t tell the whole story, attorney Mary L. Topliff and HR consultant Marianne Jones say. The two conducted a Business and Legal Resources webinar in 2012 titled “After the Investigation: HR’s Action Plan for Workforce Recovery and Refocus” that teaches lessons for today’s employers who find themselves working to undo damage left in the wake of allegations and investigations.

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Cure and punishment

by Mark I. Schickman

In all of the attention recently given to Harvey Weinstein and his ilk, the focus has been on personalities and far too little of it on the systemic problem of ubiquitous sexual harassment. The discussion has been centered on punishment, with far too little said about the cure.  Stop Sexual Harassment red stop sign held by a female

Weinstein himself presents a plain and straightforward case of sexual harassment—a double dose of quid pro quo and hostile environment harassment directed against people who work for him. Miramax claims “shock and . . . utter surprise” at the sexual harassment allegations against him—hard enough to believe. But the legal test is whether Miramax knew or should have known of sexual harassment in its workplace, and it loses under that test. As serious an individual issue as this is for Weinstein, it’s also a bigger failing for the corporate employer that let it happen.

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Nobody’s perfect: Unconscious bias at work

September 10, 2017 - by: admin 0 COMMENTS

by Lisa ChapmanDiversity Insight unconscious bias 2
Royse Law Firm, PC

Whether you work in an office or not, you should care about harassment in the workplace. It can be verbal or nonverbal, and the perpetrators often aren’t fully aware of the negative implications behind their words or actions. Whether we’re on the receiving end of the harassment or the ones making the comments, the way we conduct ourselves at work and in life has a direct impact on the reputation of our company and the individuals who comprise it.

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