Ivy League or State U? Employers considering educational diversity

November 15, 2015 - by: Tammy Binford 0 COMMENTS

Once upon a time a resume touting a prestigious university would automatically land at the top of a recruiter’s stack. Conventional wisdom dictated that a degree from an esteemed school signaled the best-educated, highest-potential candidates. But now a desire for educational diversity may be changing the old way of thinking.

Professional services firm Deloitte announced in late September that its United Kingdom operations would introduce a university-blind interview system for entry-level recruits “to help prevent unconscious bias and ensure that job offers are made on the basis of present potential, not past personal circumstance,” according to a post on the company’s blog.College Diploma, Cap, and Tassel

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Leading with emotional intelligence

by Jimmy Daniel

75% of careers are derailed for reasons related to emotional competencies, including inability to handle interpersonal problems; unsatisfactory team leadership during times of difficulty or conflict; or inability to adapt to change or elicit trust.

—The Center for Creative Leadership

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The H-1B loophole: replacing American workers with foreigners to cut costs

by Cristopher Willis

Each year, the United States grants 85,000 H-1B employment visas, and every single one is highly sought after by American companies. These temporary work visas allow companies to hire international applicants with college degrees—often advanced—in a variety of fields, such as medicine and health care, engineering, architecture, accounting, and the arts.P52 - Week 3 Circles - Mickey Power

H-1B visas broaden the pool of highly skilled workers from which an employer can draw, and federal guidelines allow their use only when American workers cannot be found. What’s not to love? Just ask the hundreds of Disney employees who were recently laid off.

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Categories: Seeking Talent


Human trafficking prevention and awareness law on the horizon

by Elizabeth B. Bradley

Do you know what lurks in your supply chain? Would you sign a certification subject to the penalties of perjury stating there is no human-trafficking-related activity anywhere in your company’s supply chain? For all federal contractors, the answer must already be “yes.” But new bills pending before Congress will bring these requirements to other U.S. employers.  trafficking

Federal contractors already covered

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Dealing with mental disabilities in the workplace

by Jonathan Mook

These days, the news is filled with stories of returning veterans who suffer from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) or other mental impairments and have problems adjusting to civilian life at home and in the workplace. The issues employers face when dealing with veterans and other employees with mental disorders were put on display by a Virginia case in which an Army veteran who suffers from PTSD sued his employer after he was fired for threatening to harm or kill other employees. The court’s decision provides helpful lessons about handling employees with mental disorders, especially when employees have legal protections under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) or the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act (USERRA)PTSD word cloud with abstract background


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Looking to hire former service members? Veterans offer advice, encouragement

October 18, 2015 - by: Tammy Binford 0 COMMENTS

As Veterans Day approaches, the nation looks at ways to honor those who have served in the military. But honors alone don’t get former service members employed once they re-enter the civilian world. So employers need not just an understanding of the legal requirements related to employing or reemploying veterans; they also need to understand the attributes veterans bring and the challenges they face when searching for civilian employment.  Military Veteran Goes to Work

Paul J. Sweeney, an attorney with Coughlin & Gerhart, LLP in Binghamton, New York, logged 29 years of active and reserve service in the Marine Corps, including a deployment to Iraq. He points to important benefits employers enjoy when hiring veterans. “As a general rule, the armed forces sets high standards when recruiting service members,” Sweeney says. “Unlike the general population, more than nine out of 10 of those who enlist in the armed forces have a high school degree. Also, the armed forces screens out those with criminal convictions and drug issues.”

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Prevent, don’t just pardon, manterrupting

by Dinita L. James

As a woman who has been in the workplace for nearly 35 years, I have a lot of experience with being interrupted by men. I also have experienced many times a phenomenon in which I make a point or share an idea in a meeting that does not appear to catch hold, only to hear the same thing stated by a man to widespread agreement a few minutes later.

As it turns out, those minor annoyances have been the subject of more than 30 years of social science research. In 1985, for example, a Harvard researcher collected numerous studies demonstrating that in mixed-sex conversations, women are interrupted far more frequently than men are. Extensive study of the phenomena, however, has not brought them to an end.Business team issue

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Friend or foe: illegal or inappropriate interview questions

by Michelle Dougherty

Asking illegal or inappropriate interview questions is one of the easiest ways for an employer to create a risk for discrimination claims. It isn’t unusual for polite, friendly, personal, non-job-specific conversation to be part of the interview process. However, when conducting an interview, you must always be aware that even indirect or inadvertent questions about a protected characteristic can give rise to a discrimination claim.  Job Interview Questions

Friendly may mean illegal

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EEOC says sexual orientation is protected under Title VII

by Courtney Bru

The last few years have seen a dramatic expansion of rights on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity. In 2013, the U.S. Supreme Court found unconstitutional the heterosexual definitions of “marriage” and “spouse” in the federal Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA). And earlier this year, the Court found same-sex marriage is a fundamental right protected by the federal constitution.  Gay Pride Flags

Another potentially more significant development has received less attention: the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) has recently taken the position that Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 affords protection from discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation.

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Policing the profiler: Ageist stereotypes exposed

by Robert Kaiser

There is a common belief in the marketplace that it’s harder to find a job if you are over 50. However, it’s difficult to establish whether that’s true, and there are many advantages to hiring a mature employee. But a recent case decided by the U.S. 8th Circuit Court of Appeals (whose rulings apply to all Arkansas, Iowa, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota employers) highlights that certain stereotypes about older workers may persist.  Dont be ageist

Hiring process looks a little shady

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Categories: Legal News


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